Saïd Razzouki Arrested in Colombia

The following news report offers a Colombian perspective on the arrest of Saïd Razzouki, the deputy leader of the “Mocro Mafia” in the Netherlands. (Previous posts on Razzouki are here and here.) This story contains the added detail that the police shot and wounded Mr. Razzouki, though not seriously.

Many thanks to FouseSquawk for translating this article from the Colombian daily El Espectador:

One of the Most Wanted in the Netherlands Detained in Medellin

February 8, 2020

Agents for the DEA and FBI participated in the capture of Said Razzouki. This was the second arrest of members of the Dutch mafia, whose leader, Ridouan Taghi, was captured in Dubai in December 2019.

The criminal most wanted by Dutch justice, the alleged drug trafficker Said Razzouki, was arrested in the Colombian city of Medellin as part of an operation in which anti-drug units of the DEA and the FBI also participated, as confirmed this Saturday by the Public Prosecutor of the Netherlands. The arrest happened last Friday in an apartment building in Medellin, though the prisoner tried to flee and was slightly wounded by police gunfire from the Colombian authorities, who carried out the arrest.

Dutch police, who explained in a statement that hundreds of investigators and specialists had been dedicated “day and night” to the search for the arrested person during recent years, asked for extradition, although it is expected that the process will take some time. A reward of €100,000 had been offered for Said Razzouki, a record total for the Dutch authorities.

Besides the Colombian authorities, the investigation team also consisted of the Public Prosecutor, Dutch police, the DEA, and the FBI, though it is still not known how they succeeded in discovering his whereabouts.

Said Razzouki, 47, was the right-hand man of the other alleged drug trafficker and leader of the Dutch mafia, Ridouan Taghi, who was extradited to the Netherlands last December after being detained in Dubai, where he had been hidden in an area of chalets, paying rent in cash, and not leaving the house in order to go unnoticed.

Both men, who had been on the international lists of search and capture, are accused of ordering several murders in recent years, and according to authorities, Razzouki is the principal suspect in the so-called Marengo Trial, which will begin next March and which will prosecute him for overseeing five murders and several attempted murders.

In this judicial process, Said Razzouki is formally accused of leading a criminal organization which had the objective of carrying out murders, such as that of the well-known reporter who specialized in topics on organized crime, Martin Kok, whom they tried to kill in 2016 with a bomb placed under his car, near Amsterdam.

A total of 17 persons, the totality of the criminal organization known as “Mocro Mafia”, are now detained in the judicial process, in which several of those linked have died before being brought before justice. The brother and the lawyer of the most important protected witness of the case, Nabil B., were shot to death in Amsterdam. It is presumed that the crime was committed with the intent of silencing them so that they could not testify.

The Arrest of Saïd Razzouki in Medellin

The following video describes the arrest of the deputy leader of the “Mocro Mafia” in Colombia, Saïd Razzouki. Mr. Razzouki’s boss was Ridouan Taghi, who had been the most wanted criminal in the Netherlands before he was arrested in Dubai last December.

See last Saturday’s article about the arrest of Saïd Razzouki.

Many thanks to FouseSquawk for the translation, and to Vlad Tepes for the subtitling:

Video transcript:

Continue reading

Mocro Mafia Busted in Colombia

Many thanks to FouseSquawk for translating this article from the Dutch daily De Telegraaf:

Adjutant of Ridouan Taghi held in Colombia

Mocro-Mafia chief Razzouki arrested

By John Van Den Heuvel
February 7, 2020

Amsterdam — The fugitive “Mocro Mafia” chief Saïd Razzouki (47) was arrested Friday by a special police unit in Medellin, Colombia. He was possibly injured during the arrest since he tried to escape through a window.

That is what sources for De Telegraaf in Colombia report. The police unit, an intelligence and investigation unit named Diran, came from the Colombian capital, Bogota.

Razzouki was a fugitive, and was considered as the adjutant of boss Ridouan Taghi, who was arrested in Dubai in December.

According to the sources, Razzouki was arrested in the Copacabana area of northern Medellin in the company of two others. The two are believed to be affiliated with the Clan de Golfo (Gulf Clan), which is counted among the suppliers of the Taghi organization.

The Public Prosecutor confirms the arrest. Razzouki is suspected of involvement in several murders. There were earlier signals that Razzouki was in Colombia. Saïd’s brother, Mo Razzouki, has been held for some time as a suspect in the Marengo murder trial.

With the arrest of Razzouki, now the entire top layer of the Moroccan Mafia is in custody. Earlier, Taghi in Dubai, Rico R. in Chile, and Naoufal in Ireland were arrested.

There was a reward of €100,000 offered by the Public Prosecutor for the golden tip that would lead to their arrests. The same amount was on Taghi’s head.

Bolsonaro Backs President Trump on Iran

You’ve probably noticed that only “deplorable” foreign leaders (such as Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orbán) have expressed public support for Donald Trump’s lethal action against Iranian General Qasem Soleimani. President Jair Bolsonaro of Brazil is one of those Deplorables.

The following video shows Mr. Bolsonaro’s remarks on the issue of Iran. José Atento of Lei Islâmica em Ação, who translated the video for subtitles, sends these contextual notes:

Two interesting reactions coming from Brazil regarding the “events in Iraq.”

First, the official communiqué from Foreign Minister Ernesto Araújo with Brazil’s official stance on the “events in Iraq and the fight against terrorism.” The first paragraph of the note already sets the tone:

“Upon learning of the actions taken by the United States in recent days in Iraq, the Brazilian Government expresses its support for the fight against the scourge of terrorism and reiterates that this fight requires the cooperation of the entire international community without seeking any justification for or relativization of terrorism.”

Today [January 8] Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro made a short statement after watching the TV statement by President Trump. In it, Bolsonaro criticizes former (Socialist) President Lula, who advocated for Iran’s enrichment of uranium, stressing that Brazil’s constitution establishes a principle that Brazil must follow in international relations: “the defense of peace and repudiation of terrorism.”

Many thanks to Vlad Tepes for the subtitling:

Video transcript:

Continue reading

Firebugs for Hire

A few months ago there were major headlines in the global media about the incidence of catastrophic fires in the Amazon Basin in Brazil. Hollywood celebrities stepped up to protest the policies of President Jair Bolsonaro and donate to the cause of saving the Amazonian rainforest.

Four activists were recently arrested in Brazil on suspicion of setting some of those catastrophic fires. It turns out that these firebugs had allegedly been the recipients of some of the hundreds of thousands of dollars donated by the actor Leonardo di Caprio to save the rainforest. The more fires, the greater the donations — right?

Many thanks to José Atento for translating this Brazilian news report, and to Vlad Tepes for the subtitling:

Video transcript:

Continue reading

Durance Not-So-Vile in the Farmville Detention Center

Farmville is a small city (population ca. 8,000) here in Central Virginia. It’s not really in my area; it’s in Southside, whereas I’m in the Piedmont. Still, it’s not all that far away, and I know it pretty well.

I remember when the immigrant detention center in Farmville was first approved and built, sometime during the Obama administration, maybe eight or ten years ago. It was designed to handle what was then considered to be the inevitable future of America: mass immigration across the southern border. A private contractor runs it on behalf of ICE (U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement).

The quotes below are excerpted from an article by Alexa Massey in The Farmville Herald. One of the things I like about truly local newspapers is that their news stories tend to be straightforward and factual, without editorial intrusions or skewing for the sake of the Narrative. This article fits the bill admirably, even if Ms. Massey did write “communicative diseases” when she meant “communicable diseases”. That’s a minor glitch in an otherwise informative article about the detention center.

The chosen excerpts are interleaved with my notes and commentary:

Detention Center: an inside look

by Alexa Massey

On Nov. 12 The Herald was invited on a tour of the Immigration Centers of America (ICA) Farmville Detention Center. The tour served as an inside look of the day-to-day operations of the facility.

On its website, the detention center states that its mission is to “provide a safe, humane and appropriately secure civil detention environment that offers an appealing alternative to the standard method of detention for federal immigrants while they navigate the immigration process.”

The facility, according to Farmville Detention Center Director Jeff Crawford, contains enough beds to house up to 736 detainees, although the number fluctuates from day to day. 576 individuals were being housed at the facility on Nov. 12, falling from a headcount of 650 the week prior. Detainees are all male and range in age with an average age of mid-30s. A typical day shift includes 28 officers on duty, and a night shift sees an average of 25 officers. The detention center as a whole has approximately 180 employees.

Based on the figures given above, we might expect an average of about 600 detainees to be housed in the detention center at any given point. There are 180 staff members, and we’ll estimate that they’re being paid an average of $40,000 a year. That may be low-balling it, but they’re private employees rather than government workers, so their pay is going to be lower than that of their counterparts in the federal workforce. Throw in the employer’s share of FICA and some benefits, and say the total expense to the contractor is about $50,000 per head. That would be a total $9 million per annum for the entire staff.

Divide that total by 600, and you get $15,000 per inmate per year. And that’s just for personnel costs. Add to that the cost of food, medical supplies, equipment, CCTV, infrastructure maintenance, plant depreciation, etc., and the total expense per inmate might be $30,000 every year. Bump the figure up a little more to assure the contractor a healthy profit margin, and you’re talking about a hefty annual bill for Uncle Sam, paid for by the U.S. taxpayer. Or, strictly speaking, paid for by having the Fed print yet more pretend money, but that’s an argument for another day.

Continue reading

Paul Sutliff on the Process of Civilization Jihad

The following video is the latest in a series from the riverside retreat held in Quebec back in September. In this installment José Atento of the Brazilian blog Lei Islâmica em Ação interviews Paul Sutliff, the author of the book Civilization Jihad and the Myth of Moderate Islam. In his talk Mr. Sutliff describes the infiltration of American institutions by the Muslim Brotherhood, and warns Brazilians that the same process will be applied to Brazil, if it isn’t underway already.

The Portuguese translation of the English-language portion of the clip is included in the transcript below. José has also translated his Portuguese introduction into English.

Many thanks to Vlad Tepes for the recording and subtitling:

Video transcript:

Continue reading

The Brazilian Connection

The following news report from Brazil gives details about the bust of a major people-smuggling ring that routes its clients from South Asia to the United States using Brazil as a primary transit point.

It should be noted that this is a criminal enterprise, and the smuggling process is very profitable. Yet the leaders of cartel are Muslims from Pakistan and Bangladesh, and its paying clients are also South Asian Muslims. This is the way migrant trafficking into the USA becomes more than a matter of poor illiterate Latin Americans swarming across the border. And I don’t have to tell you that this is also how jihad is imported into the United States.

Many thanks to José Atento for the translation, and to Vlad Tepes for the subtitling:

Video transcript:

Continue reading

Brad Johnson on Security Issues and Organized Crime in Latin America

The following video is the latest in a series from the retreat held in Quebec earlier this month. In this installment José Atento of the Brazilian blog Lei Islâmica em Ação interviews Brad Johnson, a former CIA station chief who now heads Americans for Intelligence Reform. The two men discuss the convergence of drug trafficking, weapons trafficking, human trafficking, and terrorism in Latin America. Mr. Johnson says the same organized crime outfits are involved in all of these nefarious activities.

The Portuguese translation of the English-language portion of the clip is included in the transcript below. José has also translated his Portuguese introduction into English.

Many thanks to Vlad Tepes for the recording and subtitling:

Video transcript:

Continue reading

Communism Achieves Dominance in Canada

In the following video from the retreat in Quebec earlier this month, José Atento of the Brazilian blog Lei Islâmica em Ação interviews Alexandra Belaire, who translates Czech for us and blogs at Xanthippa’s Chamberpot. The Portuguese translation of the English-language portion of the clip is included in the transcript below; José also translated his Portuguese introduction into English.

Many thanks to Vlad Tepes for the recording and subtitling:

Video transcript:

Continue reading

Brazil’s Bolsonaro Beats Macron (And the Globalist Media)

Below is a follow-up by José Atento of Lei Islâmica em Ação to our earlier report on the Amazon fires and the interference by the G7.

Brazil’s Bolsonaro beats Macron (and the globalist media)

by José Atento

You probably have heard the fires in the Amazon region described as a great tragedy that is only occurring because of the “deplorable” government of Brazil, under President Jair Bolsonaro, and how the forest is doomed, and the planet’s oxygen is about to run out, global warming will peak to unprecedented levels, etc.

In reality, what happened was a large operation orchestrated by the globalist media with three objectives:

1.   Destabilize the Bolsonaro government and destroy the recently-signed commercial agreement between the European Union and Mercosul.

Why was Macron so adamant against Brazil, even asking for a boycott and the cancellation of this agreement? Because Macron is afraid of the power of Brazilian agro-business and how it will affect his already precarious situation with the French public, particularly, with its rural population.

The problem is that it becomes very difficult to use lies in the age of Internet. Macron used false data and old pictures, which have been readily debunked.

2.   Create a situation that supports the call for international intervention, beginning with the Amazon Synod currently being organized by Pope Francis.

One cannot dismiss the influence that the Catholic Church still has, particularly in a majority Catholic country like Brazil. And we know Pope Francis is more interested in the environment than in Christians who are being slaughtered by Islam, Communism and narco-trafficking. Such intervention would be consolidated by the more than one thousand international NGOs that have operated in the Amazon for a long time, with the support of the former Brazilian socialist government, and have received international donations from the Amazon Fund.

3.   Based on this “environmental catastrophe”, put a portion of Brazilian territory under international rule. This would be accomplished by the creation of the Triple-A Corridor, connecting the Andes, the Amazon and the Atlantic, governed by indigenous nations under the control of international NGOs and big global financiers. All natural resources (including 90% of the world’s niobium reserves) would be under international control. (Who said the Globalist-Left alliance is against colonialism and imperialism?)
 

The lies were magnified to the maximum and barely dismissed afterwards. For example, the lie that the city of São Paulo was darkened by smoke from the Amazon. The media directly blamed Bolsonaro for the fires in the Amazon, hiding the fact that this is seasonal, and this year has been far from the worst.

Continue reading

Mexican Racists Thwart the Will of African Migrants

Angry African migrants have gathered at the border crossing from Guatemala to Tapachula in southern Mexico. These culture-enrichers have been battling with the police and demanding free passage through Mexico to El Norte, which they consider their rightful future abode. Anyone who hinders them in their journey is of necessity a WAYCIST.

Many thanks to FouseSquawk for translating this TV news report, and to Vlad Tepes for the subtitling:

Video transcript:

Continue reading

The Bolsonaro Government Flips the Bird at Emmanuel Macron

Because the Brazilian people elected a populist president rather than a leftist or a globalist, the international community has decided to raise the alarm about fires in the vicinity of the Amazon rainforest, even though the fires are well within the normal range for the season. Fiercer and more extensive fires are currently burning in the African tropics, but the countries involved have not sinned against the New World Order, so there is no alarmed campaign about them in the media.

At the recent G7 meeting in France, President Emmanuel “Toy Boy” Macron led the way in proposing an aid package to manipulate help Brazil during the wildfire “crisis”. In response, Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro and his ministers were forthright in directing their tongue-lashings towards Mr. Macron and other members of the G7.

Many thanks to José Atento of Lei Islâmica em Ação for translating this post from the blog at Globo.com:

Onyx says government will reject G7 financial aid announced by Macron

The French president stated that group will send 20 million euros to combat fires. ‘Perhaps these resources are more relevant to reforest Europe,’ replied the minister.

by Gerson Camarotti and Mateus Rodrigues
August 26, 2019

The Minister of the House, Onyx Lorenzoni, told the blog that the government will reject the aid of the G7 to combat the fires in the Amazon, which was announced on Monday (August 26) by French President Emmanuel Macron. The office of the Planalto Palace confirmed the information given by Onyx.

The aid was announced in France after Macron attended a G7 meeting. According to him, the group decided to allocate €20 million to combat the fire [later, the French government corrected itself and reported that it was $20 million].

The French President and President Jair Bolsonaro have been publicly criticizing each other since last week.

“Thanks, but perhaps these resources are more relevant to reforesting Europe. Can Macron not even prevent a predictable fire in a church that is a World Heritage Site, yet wants to teach something to our country? He has a lot to look after at home and in the French colonies,” Onyx told the blog.

“Brazil is a democratic, free nation, and has never engaged in colonialist and imperialist practices, as is perhaps the objective of the French Macron. Incidentally, coincidentally, with high domestic rejection rates,” added the minister of the Civil House.

Onyx Lorenzoni also said to the blog that Brazil can teach “any nation” how to protect native forests. “By the way, there is no country that has a larger native coverage than ours,” he added.

MRE speaks of ‘redundant initiatives’

By means of a note, the Ministry of Foreign Relations (MRE) reported that despite the “supposed launch of new initiatives related to the Amazon” to reforest the region, there are already instruments provided for this type of measure.

According to the note, the actions are foreseen in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and already include, for example, the payment by developed countries like France of US $30 billion for the reduction in Brazil of greenhouse gas emissions.

“France — and other countries that may support its ideas — are expected to engage seriously in these discussions within the UNFCCC, rather than launching redundant initiatives, with amounts well below their international commitments, and with ambiguous innuendo about the principle of national sovereignty,” states the MRE.

Continue reading