History Quiz

QUIZ

by Michael Copeland

(Originally published at LibertyGB)

(Clue: one answer fits all.)

1.   What made it essential to fortify the Vatican?
2.   What triggered the founding of the defensive Knights Templar?
3.   What caused the beheading of the 800 men of Otranto, Italy?
4.   What led Columbus and his backers to explore westwards?
5.   What caused the Hindu Kush (Kush meaning ‘slaughter’)?
6.   What do the turbans of pantomime pirates denote?
7.   What made Istanbul’s Basilica of Holy Wisdom cease to be a church?
8.   What caused the kidnapping of the women and children of Baltimore, Ireland?
9.   What caused the USA to establish the Marine Corps?
10.   What caused the genocide of Armenians?
11.   What caused Salman Rushdie to need armed guards?
12.   What is “incompatible with the fundamental principles of democracy”?
 

For previous essays by Michael Copeland, see the Michael Copeland Archives.

Fifteen Years

During her tenure here Dymphna wrote repeatedly about the strange lack of commemorative attention that the anniversaries of the 7/7 bombings in London have received in the UK.

There may have been a significant observance on the first anniversary, but from the second onwards the date passed each year with scant public acknowledgement. I don’t know what the British media are saying today; perhaps our readers in the UK can provide their observations. I think I saw a news headline about the mayor of London, Sadiq Khan (no relation to Mohammad Sidique Khan, one of the bombers), laying a wreath at the memorial in Hyde Park.

For those who were too young at the time, or have forgotten: today is the fifteenth anniversary of the series of coordinated Islamic terror attacks on public transportation in London on July 7, 2005. The bombs went off during the morning rush hour, killing fifty-two people in addition to the mujahideen who carried out the attacks. Hundreds of others were wounded.

The atrocities were perpetrated by Mohammad Sidique Khan, Hasib Hussain, Germaine Lindsay, and Shehzad Tanweer, giving the incident a Mohammed Coefficient of 25%.

Readers can look at conditions in London and the UK today and decide for themselves whether the 7/7 attacks made Britons wake up and smell the halal coffee. Personally, I think the surname of the mayor of London tells us all we need to know.

Spengler on Militant Religiosity

“The present can only accomplish its purification by the erasure of its past.”

Below is the third of Thomas Bertonneau’s three-essay sequence on the crisis of modernity.

Spengler on Militant Religiosity

by Thomas F. Bertonneau

Oswald Spengler (1880-1936), the German historian and philosopher, devotes a suite of three chapters (VII, VIII, and IX) in his Decline of the West, Volume II (1922), to what he calls “The Problems of the Arabian Culture.” The third of these chapters, “Pythagoras, Mohammed, Cromwell,” explores the parallelisms that, in Spengler’s view, and in his use of the word, make these figures “contemporary” with one another. The same chapter also contains Spengler’s analysis of Puritanism, but not strictly in the sense of Calvinist doctrine, although he includes Calvinism in his discussion. Spengler views Puritanism as an inevitable phase of religion, one of doctrinal hardening and literalism in which a totalitarian impulse predominates. Puritanism has manifested itself in all the Great Cultures, as Spengler calls them, such as the Chinese, the Classical, and the Gothic. By “The Problems of Arabian Culture” Spengler does not mean to confine himself to a history of Monophysitism or Islam, although these come under his three-chapter remit. Spengler subsumes “Arabian Culture” under the larger category of “Magian Culture,” which embraces both Arabia Felix and Arabia Deserta but reaches far beyond them to aspects of the late Persian and Syriac societies, to the Hellenism of Alexandria, and even to the Iconoclastic centuries of Byzantium. The term Magian also reaches back in time to the late stages of Mesopotamian society. For Spengler, St. Augustine shares rather more with Islamic theology than he does, say, with St. Thomas and the Scholastics. For Spengler, the Hagia Sophia of Constantinople anticipates the mosque. To understand the chapter-sequence on “The Problems of Arabian Culture,” however, requires that Spengler’s often shocking and sometimes counter-intuitive pronouncements, like the ones just mentioned, take their place among the over-arching assumptions of The Decline.

Spengler’s opus impresses the first-time reader as a colossal improvisation. Its erudition and seeming formlessness put off many would-be explorers. Spengler’s basic propositions nevertheless lend themselves to summary. Spengler rejects the idea of a universal history. He recognizes no singular history but a number of histories in the plural, each one peculiar to its own Great Culture. Thus the Classical or Mediterranean Culture begins with the palace kingdoms of Mycenaean Greece and ends with the Severan Dynasty of the Late Second and Early Third Centuries. Indian Culture begins with the Vedas and ends with Buddhism. Western or “Faustian” Culture has its earliest glimmerings in the Eighth Century but really only leaps into being after the year 1000. Western Culture preserves a profound awareness of Classical Culture but this awareness implies, for Spengler, no actual continuity. Each Great Culture constitutes itself hermetically as an organic whole without debt to adjacent or precursor cultures. Borrowings are never essential, but only ornamental. Spengler emphasizes the organic character of culture. He regards each Great Culture as a living entity, whose mortality impends as soon as it comes to birth. Each Great Culture follows the same seasonal life-course — a vivacious and creative spring, a productive summer, a crisis-afflicted fall, and an increasingly inflexible winter. Spengler also makes a distinction between culture, as such, and civilization. Culture flourishes as the vital phase; civilization takes over as the mechanical phase, becoming more and more rigid until the machine stops.

Each Great Culture first expresses itself in a springtime outburst of religion. The Classical pantheon and associated cults already existed in late Mycenaean times; Homer and Hesiod signify a literate transformation of a long existing Apollonian worldview, as Spengler calls it. By the time of Septimius Severus (reigned 193-211), the Classical religion has become a syncretic henotheism, with one god in numerous guises, complete with a church-structure wedded to the state. Whereas the springtime paganism knew nothing of prejudice, the syncretic henotheism has codified itself as a set of compulsory dogmas. Spengler distinguishes between a Magian and a Gothic Christianity, which have little or nothing to do with one another. The latter appears with the building of the Lady Churches and with the blazing out of sacred polyphony. By the time of the Baroque, however, Catholicism has become the counterpart of syncretic henotheism. A living entity no longer, the Church distinguishes itself hardly at all from the array of explicitly secular institutions. As for Magian Christianity, Spengler classifies it as one of many apocalyptic movements that participate in the same mundial vision. These dispensations show themselves initially around the time of Alexander’s campaigns. Spengler writes in Vol. II, Chapter VIII, how “the world, as spread out for the Magian waking-consciousness, possesses a kind of extension that may be called cavern-like.” A “primary dualism” governs the world-cavern of this revelation: “The light shines through the cavern and battles the darkness.” The Magian Culture reaches its final, ossified phase when Mohammed issues his unalterable Koran and commences his coercive mission.

If social, spiritual, and intellectual rigor mortis belonged to the autumnal and hibernal chapters of the cultural life-course, this would not mean that earlier chapters exhibited no forecast of rigidification. Spasms of Puritanism occur in the vernal and estival chapters but show themselves as liable to suppression by the still-vivacious environments where they arise. The first name in the title of Spengler’s third of three chapters on “The Problems of Arabian Culture” is that of Pythagoras, whose person will be familiar to most readers through its association with the theorem of the right triangle. The lifetime of Pythagoras spans most of the Sixth Century BC, with scholarship locating his birth around 570 and his death around 495. The prevailing myth treats Pythagoras in an anodyne way: Philosopher, mystic, mathematician, vegetarian, discoverer of the cosmic harmony, and champion of animals. Pythagoras invited veneration from the Florentine Humanists and again from the French Symbolists as an idealist and altruist. The truth puts Pythagoras in quite a different light. “Pythagoras was not a philosopher,” Spengler writes; but rather, “he was a saint, prophet and founder of a fanatically religious society that forced its truths upon the people around it by every political and military means.” Croton, the Greek colony in Southern Italy where Pythagoras took up residence in middle life, raised an army under his regime that “in the bitter earnest of [its] gospel of duty duly wrecked gay Sybaris and branded it forever a city without morals.” What was that “gospel”? It consists of the “enthusiasms of a sober spirit, cold intensities, dry mysticism, [and] pedantic ecstasy.”

Pythagoreanism belongs under the category of Puritanism. Spengler defines Puritanism as a symptom of dour old-age: “It lacks the smile that had illumined the religion of the Spring… the moments of profound joy in life, the humour of life.” The destruction of Sybaris, around 510 BC, finds affirmation in both history and archaeology; the city suffered such violence that its survivors had to abandon it and take up residence elsewhere, as in Thurii. The wrath unleashed against Sybaris has lodged in the collective memory, Spengler speculates, “because it was the climax of a wild religious war… an explosion of the same hate that saw in Charles I and his gay Cavaliers not merely doctrinal error, but also worldly disposition as something that must be destroyed root and branch.” Furthermore, “A myth purified and conceptually fortified, combined with rigorous ethical precepts, imbued the Pythagoreans with the conviction that they would attain salvation before all other men.” The South-Italian cities that had come under the sway of the collective enthusiasm eventually found the furor too much to bear. Inspired by Spengler, the scholar Kurt von Fritz issued his book Pythagorean Politics in Southern Italy in 1940. Von Fritz pieces together a simultaneous multi-city uprising that in the space of a few days wreaked vengeance on the Pythagorean committees, burned down their lodges, and suppressed the fanatical portion of their following. Spengler notes that the Pythagorean writings, such as the Golden Tablets, make the promise to loyal adherents of elevation to godhood. That degree of self-satisfaction and self-righteousness could only — and soon — draw forth condign reaction.

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Europe Down the Pan

This essay by Michael Copeland was originally published at LibertyGB in September of 2015.

Europe Down the Pan

by Michael Copeland

The EU’s much-vaunted “Core Values” are a scam. Dishonestly promoted as “for economic benefit”, their real purpose is Nation-Breaking, to undermine and destroy the national identities and cultures, so as to create a brave new Afro-Eurabia with the EU’s unelected elites in control.

Free Movement, Asylum Granting and Welfare Provision have together created a dire and dangerous Gold Rush.

Nobody was asked. The tainted BBC, in full propaganda mode, soaks the airwaves with emotive images of dead children to manipulate public opinion: Goebbels would have been delighted. The traitor class politicians continue to push this insanity, inflicting “quotas” of Africans and others on the unwilling populations of member States, but not, of course, on themselves.

The sinister compulsory Free Movement obligation of the Schengen “agreement” means that those millions of miles of EU outer border, Greek islands, Atlantic islands, African enclaves, and French colonies like Mayotte, are ALL targets for invaders seeking to benefit their lives and enhance their own welfare. The fit strong young African man, in “Europe or Die”, a documentary, explains (at 0.58):

“I left my country for a better life, for a new life, for freedom.”

Coudenhove-Kalergi

A man with a rather cumbersome name, Richard Coudenhove-Kalergi, is considered the “grandfather” of the EU. In the 1920s he was dreaming of a Pan-European State long before the EU’s predecessors were founded. In his memory, the EU awards a Coudenhove-Kalergi Prize to politicians who have helped his dream. Merkel and van Rompuy have both received it.

Coudenhove-Kalergi, a man of mixed race — his mother was Japanese — had a vision of the Europe of the future. This is what he wrote:

“The man of the future will be of mixed race. Today’s races and classes will gradually disappear… The Eurasian-Negroid race of the future will replace the diversity of peoples…”

— Richard Coudenhove-Kalergi, Praktischer Idealismus (Practical Idealism)

An Italian article, originally posted on Identità, bears this perceptive heading:

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Eric Voegelin on Gnostic Modernity

As a follow-up to his previous essay, Thomas Bertonneau discusses the work of Eric Voegelin and its relevance to this Gnostic age of post-modernity.

Eric Voegelin on Gnostic Modernity

by Thomas F. Bertonneau

A previous essay to this one on José Ortega y Gasset began with the claim that the past speaks to the present more pertinently than the present speaks to itself, but that the present, in assessing itself as the culmination of human advancement, actively disdains the past and prefers to stuff its ears. The essence of the modern psyche — which Ortega explores in his Revolt of the Masses (1930) — is paradoxically to be at once emphatically assured of its knowledge and wisdom but, in Ortega’s phrase, conscientiously ignorant of anything outside its radically narrow field of expertise, which it mistakes for a totality. The modern mind cuts itself off from the stream of human experience, oblivious, in its conceit, to the necessity of temporality, memory, and history in the very constitution of consciousness. Ortega’s phenomenology of the arrogant, self-limiting, and abjectly self-unaware subject finds a counterpart in the first important work of a thinker belonging to the generation after the Spaniard — The New Science of Politics (1952) by Eric Voegelin (1901-1985), who left Austria after the Anschluss, came to the U.S.A., and eventually attained a fellowship in political science at the Hoover Institute at Stanford University, where he practiced from 1969 to 1985. In The New Science, Voegelin advanced his thesis, which he would elaborate in subsequent books and essays, that modernity is “Gnostic,” a term referring to a set of exotic theologies, parasitizing on Christianity, which troubled the religious landscape of Late Antiquity, particularly in period of the Second and Third Centuries, and reemerged in the Middle Ages.

Voegelin’s thesis will undoubtedly strike the newcomer as arcane or even bizarre, but its affinity with Ortega’s descriptions of self-denominating expertise and conscientious ignorance offers a path to understanding. In Voegelin’s analysis, “Gnosticism,” like Ortega’s expertise, erroneously assesses its limitation and partiality as fullness and wholeness and in doing so substitutes a hallucinatory “second reality” for the first or real reality comprising the actual human situation and the fact of the cosmos. Like Ortega’s expertise, Gnosticism, whether of the Late-Antique or modern varieties, recoils from external courts of appeal. Averse to questions, Gnosticism seeks reflexively to prohibit interrogation or critique. Rhetorically, Gnosticism reverses all terms; it sets the inherited representation of the world on its head and makes of that inversion an absolute dogma. Thus the original Gnostics of the Second Century qualified the composite God of the Old and New Testaments as a false god — the creator of this world, yes, but of a botched world in which the Gnostic, who enjoys non-experiential knowledge of the supposed real world, feels himself a stranger. Gnosticism rests foundationally on the presumption that this world partakes in wicked unreality; that this world springs from a conspiracy of malign forces, and that, by the pronunciation of magical formulas this world may be abolished and replaced by the authentic and perfected world. The label of fanatical delusion fits well the Gnostic attitude.

Voegelin, by the time he wrote The New Science, had concluded that the modern political ideologies — Marxism, Communism, Socialism, National Socialism, and lesser creeds such as Eugenics and Technocracy — corresponded at least analogically to the Gnostic doctrines of the Early Christian Era. Voegelin’s discovery of the phenomenological convergence of Second-Century heresy and Twentieth-Century ideology developed from an argument he made more than a decade before in a book entitled The Political Religions (1939). Totalitarian societies tend to organize themselves in cultic fashion, Voegelin argued, and to establish themselves as secular creeds, dissent from which constitutes apostasy and invites condign punishment. The agents of the totalitarian regime regard themselves as makers of a new world, and thus, collectively, as the functional equivalent of religion’s Creator God. At the same time, ideology universally rejects the concept of transcendence. What the symbols of theology put beyond immanence, transfigured humanity and a faultless society, ideology posits as achievable in history. For the ideologue, as Voegelin writes in Religions, “the end realm is no longer a transcendent community of the spirit but an earthly condition of perfected humanity.”

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London is Being Ethnically Cleansed — The Rest of us Are Next

London saw swarms of Black Lives Matter marauders again this weekend. Seneca III sends this report.

London is Being Ethnically Cleansed — The Rest of us Are Next

by Seneca III

Preamble

Today in Africa-on-Thames there were two supposed ‘protests’. Their assembly points, routes and final destinations had been designated and published to keep them separate at all times before the dispersal time of 1500hrs. Either by intent or by sheer incompetence the Metropolitan Police under the titular command of Commissioner Cressida Dick, but actually under that of the Mayor, Sadiq Khan, the Paki bus driver’s son, one time legal defender of Muslim terrorists and a Labour Party stalwart, failed miserably.

One of these groups was the usual collection of BLM/Antifa semi-sentient thugs and criminals who by now had learned how to co-ordinate their movements — well, they’ve certainly had a lot of practice recently!

The other group were a relatively smaller ragtag and barely organised bunch of anti-BLM protestors whom the Police tightly kettled in a small corner of Trafalgar Square, their designated area, such that when the Black mob were permitted to infiltrate the area the Brits were trapped and had to sustain a barrage of flares and firecrackers. Plod did nothing to stop this nor other sporadic attacks upon them.

However, no doubt our impartial media will report otherwise. Here I will end this brief report on the early situation and focus on a singular event which occurred elsewhere after the second group had left the area and it was occupied by the cheering Black mob punching their fists into the air as if to threaten Nelson himself. As, again, Plod looked on.

They thought they had won, and they had, thanks to Khan and Dick and their inadequate and in many cases Common-Purposed constabulary on the ground. I wonder what the hero of Trafalgar, still stolidly looking straight ahead, must have thought of that disgusting scene playing out below.

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Simian pack-attack on a lone white man and then a possible knifing/slashing followed by a head stomping when he goes down.

In Africa this is the norm — remember Rwanda? …

…and here in what once was our capital city the immigrant hunting pack gathers and attacks its prey.

As the prey tries to escape it is encircled and there is now nothing left to it can do but face its fate.

Then one of the pack breaks away, the one in the grey track suit, seen here just off the left shoulder of the other hoodie who is waiting in the foreground to make a quick, covert, weapons pass to the striker.

Meanwhile the fleeing prey is finally stopped dead in its tracks by a stomach kick from a third animal.

Animal 1 then uses whatever is passed (by the look of the way it is being held probably a small, concealable fist shiv designed to slash rather than wound, a popular piece of kit where these bottom-dwellers camp out).

Note the position of its right hand and arm ready for an upward extended strike and then a swift slicing withdrawal.

Note again that this is not a punch, but a move to pass the weapon under the chin and then draw it back across the throat of the prey.

Which it does and then turns and legs it, disappearing off screen still clasping whatever is in its hand.

Note also the gloves it is wearing so that there will be no DNA trace or prints on the weapon in case it has to be quickly dumped — the passer was also wearing gloves, so there can be little doubt that this was a well-practised and common procedure. The motif on the hat of the other thing in the foreground says all you need to know, really.

The full video is below — if it has not already been pulled by the time this report is published. Everything happens very quickly, and to follow the action in detail you will have to rapidly stop-start several times.

Conversely, earlier, this one was protesting ‘peacefully’, albeit somewhat loudly…

…but the…

…in the main sequence above were not protesting, they were out for a kill.

Penultimately, take a look at this snap just before Plod arrived and broke up the final stages of the attack with some difficulty. The female in the white top and blue jeans was one of the kickers/head-stompers…

[Tip —she leads with the left boot so is probably a southpaw.]

…and here she is bugging out as Plod arrived. I wonder if anyone knows who she is?

And, just to complete the icing on Plod’s cake in case they are actually looking for them in order to charge them with ‘accidental wounding’ or something similar (protected species, remember!), here is a different picture of the principal perp without his hood and mask.

He’s really not the ripest coconut on the palm tree after all.

*   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *

Whatever else this day may have done, it has illuminated the fact that within human cultures, particularly between civilized peoples and rampaging barbarians, war has always been the most common form of political intercourse between tribes. It is invariably the result of competition for resources, precipitated by an incursion or invasion undertaken by one group with the intention of seizing the resources of another group.

As the human mind is inarguably the ultimate resource our species possesses, it endows unlimited power and wealth upon those who can control it. Be they priests or politicians, or an unholy alliance of both, those who seek to gain such control so define their ultimate objective. Hence, the suppression or subordination of a group identity is the principal determinant in the enslavement or extermination of one tribe by another. It is both the essential precursor to and the sine qua non of abiding conquest… and it’s happening to us now.

This, however, is not unusual: The historic course of all civilizations is cyclic in nature. Over a period of three to four hundred years, on average, all of them return to a similar common starting point, a point always defined by a darkness of the collective soul and a loss of moral fortitude. It is there and then that an inevitable movement for a return to old ways and meanings begins to form. Imagine if you will a civilization’s chronological pendulum completing a vertical ellipse rather than just an arc at the bottom.

At the superior apogee, twelve noon in the cycle, the pendulum almost pauses at a point of stability before beginning its inevitable descent, accelerating slowly at first, even imperceptibly, but ever faster as the gravity of cultural entropy increases its velocity until it approaches the inferior apogee, midnight, where then it begins its at first rapid but ever-slowing climb back into the light.

It is there, at midnight and immediately before and beyond, that chaos rules, and with it comes a time in human affairs that does indeed try men’s souls; a time where dawn remains but a hope beyond an unseen horizon, where the night people are well about and yet to be put to the sword and where is found the formative crucible within which men and women, bound by strength and tradition, gather together and stand firm against the depredations of barbarism.

Here is a standard media mealy mouthed subservient ‘far-right this and far-right that’ report from Breitbart London… Andrew must be turning in has grave.

The same applies to the Daily Mail by several orders of magnitude; I gave up trying to count the number of times it used the phrase ‘FAR RIGHT’! However, read the comments and you will see that the readership does not agree.

The link to the video of the purported knifing incident is here, and you the reader must make your own analysis and come to your own conclusions, as no further news has broken as of the time of writing.

Conclusion

As the future unfolds before us, we white, real indigenous Brits are going to have to make a stand or turn our backs on what we once were and should have remained and accept what is coming down on us. Unless we take that future into own hands, act according to our needs and damn the traitors in Westminster* and the media parrots, then we are finished, ethnically cleansed and forgotten… the fate of all tribes that cannot or will not defend themselves and repel invaders with a greater ferocity than that which is being inflicted upon them.

The future always belongs to the victorious, not to the defeated.

— Seneca III, as my homeland sky darkens about me in sunny Middle England on this the 13th day of June in the year of our Lord 2020.

*   That ‘Great White Hope’, Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson, Prime Minister of Great Britain and Northern Ireland who was once touted as a possible Churchill Mark 2 has demonstrated that his loyalties do not lie with us, the native islanders, and is abasing himself, and us, by groveling at the feet of the invaders and the media scum as in the background the sound of primitive howling comes from an alien pack of hyenas on the attack. He even makes Chamberlain appear patriotic.
 

For links to previous essays by Seneca III, see the Seneca III Archives.

Identity

Our Israeli correspondent MC has some thoughts on socialism, Black Lives Matter, the ancient Hebrews, and related topics.

Those who claim that socialism will work ‘this time around’, and that the previous iterations failed because they did not implement socialism properly, may have a point. The National Socialism of the Third Reich was eerily sound and stable, and in all truth, it was brought down only by the unsound and unstable socialism of Joseph Stalin.

The Communist version of socialism never works, probably more because of what it lacks, than what it espouses. Communism (and many other forms of socialism) lack the warmth of heart that humans need to survive.

National Socialism was about being German, and on the whole Germans loved it. It enhanced their identity, their oneness, and they were thus able to express a warmth to other Germans. In Stalin’s Russia, everyone outside of one’s family circle was a potential enemy.

In this we can see the roots of the politics of racism. To a German Nazi, a non-German (or a Jew/Slav/Gypsy) was not automatically part of the comfortable clique, but for a Russian, there was no comfortable clique at all.

I came across a photograph on the internet the other day. It was on a forum and the poster was asking if anybody knew anything about this photo that had been found in an old box.

I am in that photo, and I remember being given five minutes’ notice by the gunnery officer. I had seen on daily orders that there was a photo session for the gunnery team, but I was a specialist, only part of the gunnery team for shore bombardment, my role being to do the math behind offsets and deflections (no computers or calculators in those days). What had not been made clear was that my ship had won the fleet gunnery trophy and the fleet shore bombardment trophy, so I was included.

The photo got me remembering the insularity of the ship’s company within the midst of all the other ships in the Royal Navy. Us and Them.

This it seems to me is why ‘racism’ is just a natural part of human life, and to turn Racism into a political thumbscrew is absolute folly.

Communism is unstable because it cannot provide for stable relationships. It cannot provide a ship’s company. It cannot provide a team that will work together and have confidence in each other. I was missing, I was searched out, and I took my place in the photo so that the team was complete and the photo meaningful.

If I had thought that my fellow crew members would rat on me for the slightest political incorrectness, I would have had to have been more careful and calculating — or suffer the consequences.

When I am accused of ‘racism’, it is as if my place in the team has been erased and my contribution excreted. The idea of racism with its sibling Islamophobia (and yes, even in some cases anti-Semitism) removes the ‘warmth of heart’ referred to above, and which is vitally necessary for the effective functioning of humanity together. Any fear of ‘racism’ is going to produce division.

Legitimate criticism of Jews, Jewishness and Israel do not constitute anti-Semitism, but picking out Jews for unbalanced criticism does. It is fine to criticise the so called ‘occupation’ if you also include all the other instances of occupation around the world, Tibet, Königsberg (Kaliningrad), Spanish Morocco, to name but a few. Israel was granted to Jews in 1922, and all nations who have signed up for the United Nations Charter have also signed up for article 80 of that Charter, which brings the 1922 Mandate for Palestine into the Charter — indeed, it could be argued that under international law, it is Jordan that has ‘occupied’ Israeli land (see article 25 of the Mandate).

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Signs and Portents Everywhere… But of What? (Interlude 5)

Here’s another interlude post in Seneca III’s latest treatise. See the archives link at the bottom of this post for previous installments in this series.

Signs and Portents Everywhere… But of What?

by Seneca III

“War is the realm of uncertainty; three quarters of the factors on which action in war is based are wrapped in a fog of greater or lesser uncertainty. A sensitive and discriminating judgment is called for — a skilled intelligence to scent out the truth.” — Carl von Clausewitz

Interlude 5 — Whiteness rising and angry torrents raging through jagged rocks.

Prelude

Love and hate are the face and obverse of the same coin. For the last thirty odd years the white race has been subjected to the irrational hatred of the black and brown races — irrational because they subliminally understand that their failures, inadequacies and sheer primitivism have prevented them from creating stable, civilized cultures of their own despite the trillions on trillions of dollars, pounds, francs, deutschmarks and now euros pumped into their failed homelands and into their murderous self-made ghettos throughout the Western Ecumene, and thus they spurn the gratitude they should express, and turn to violent mayhem.

This should come of no surprise to seasoned observers of barbarian cultures. Essentially, after decades of our trying to help them in recompense for some of our ancestors’ actions hundreds of years ago, they are now openly spitting in our faces and physically attacking us with increasing ferocity in the expectation that we will be consumed by guilt and contrition and that consequently we will do nothing and meekly take it on the chin.

Well, they are wrong, and now they must face our hatred as we flip the coin over; the Law of Unintended Consequences has kicked in and is evolving into a force to be reckoned with — the BLM and Antifa thugs and other congenital liars and chancers of various persuasions are about to get their comeuppance. We understand now that this is a survival fight and we must treat it as such.

Report
1500-1930hrs 06/06/2020

Winston Churchill’s statue has been vandalized on the 76th Anniversary of D-Day (and so has Abraham Lincoln’s).

This not the first time Britain has come under attack and nor will be the last, but it will help us to deal with it if we absorb and remember these words:

“This is only the beginning of the reckoning. This is only the first sip, the first foretaste of a bitter cup which will be proffered to us year by year unless by a supreme recovery of moral health and martial vigour, we arise again and take our stand for freedom as in the olden time.” ― Winston S. Churchill

Thus, the barbarism continues; a mob in the vicinity of Downing Street have just thrown a bicycle — probably stolen, of course — and fired red flares at a police horse, causing it to bolt and unseat the rider.

She is sprawled on the ground, face up, unmoving, and she doesn’t look good at all.

Meanwhile, in Whitehall, the Cenotaph is being desecrated despite the fact that it is hallowed ground and, amongst many others, remembers and acknowledges the thousands of black and brown soldiers, sailors and airmen from what is now the Commonwealth who gave their lives in two World Wars. Statues and memorials can be cleaned or repaired as needs be whilst the memory of this evil day will remain…

…and burnt flags will be replaced.

This, I suspect, this is what the cousins across the pond mean by the phrase ‘A Chimpout’.

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The End Times of Albion: Tottenham (Reprised)

As an extended interlude in his latest series, Seneca III suggested the republication of the following essay from July 2018.

He said: “I have been commenting at great length this weekend on UK sites, and one theme that keeps cropping up there is anger at the actions of and incitements by black politicians, particularly those of David Lammy, the MP for Tottenham. Reading these rang a bell with me. I recalled that I had written an extensive and appropriate article on Tottenham and Lammy a couple of years ago.”

The End Times of Albion: Hirsch + Hirsch and others — BAME Racism Echoing Through Feminist Megaphones

The End Times of Albion, Part 7C

by Seneca III

Tottenham

The ancient locale of Tottenham lies six miles due north of the Tower of London and a mile west of the City. It has existed for over a thousand years since a man named Totta or Tota established a homestead, or ‘Ham’ in old English, as derived from the Proto-Germanic ‘haimaz’, and it has grown and changed in various stages since that time.

It was recorded in the 1086 Domesday Book as Toteham when about 70 families lived within the area of the manor. From the Tudor period onwards, Tottenham became a popular recreation and leisure destination for wealthy Londoners. Henry VIII is known to have visited Bruce Castle, and also hunted in Tottenham Wood.

In 1894 Tottenham was made an urban district, and on 27 September 1934 it became a municipal borough. From 1 April 1965, the municipal borough formed part of the London Borough of Haringey and was thus absorbed into the Metropolitan conglomerate.

One of its most prominent sons who comes down to us through the pages of history is Sir Henry Percy (1364—1403), known as Harry Hotspur, eldest son of the 1st Earl of Northumberland. As a result of the reputation he had established as a fearless and heroic warrior, Percy earned the nickname ‘Hotspur’ from his willingness to charge into the thickest part of battle, and his frequent use of spurs when riding.

His reputation continued to grow until he was slain at the Battle of Shrewsbury in 1403, at which time his family owned large tracts of land in Tottenham. He is depicted as Hotspur in Shakespeare’s Henry IV, Part 1, and it was after his determination and courage that the local — and down the years a very successful football team — ‘Tottenham Hotspur’, were named.

Today, Tottenham it is a very different place, and is represented in Parliament by Labour MP David Lammy…

…a London born parliamentarian of British Guianese (now known as Guyana) parentage who grew up in Tottenham and succeeded that infamous Georgetown, Guiana-born racist Bernie Grant, MP, the previous Labour incumbent from 1987 until his death in 2000.

Coincidentally or otherwise, Tottenham is immediately adjacent to the Hackney North and Stoke Newington constituency of that towering intellect, KFC bon vivant and motorcycle pillion passenger, the fragrant Dianne Abbott, MP…

…Labour Shadow Home Secretary, champion of mathematical ineptitude and semi-permanent member of the panel on David Dimbleby’s BBC weekly flying circus known as Question Time.

In a 1984 interview with the journal of the Labour Committee on Ireland (LCI), when asked if she saw herself as Black British, Abbott replied, “No — I would self-define myself just as Black. Though I was born here in London, I couldn’t identify as British and anyway most British people don’t accept us as British. God! British people can be so racist

Yet later, whilst condemning everyone else’s children to an education in the largely failing inner city comprehensives in her constituency, she persisted in sending her son to an expensive white British boarding school, despite having previously raged on about such privileged establishments which, incidentally, her affirmative-actioned life and opportunities had made possible for her to afford. In some instances, gratitude doesn’t even have a half-life — it has no life at all.

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Signs and Portents Everywhere… But of What? (Interlude 4)

Here’s another interlude post in Seneca III’s latest treatise. See the archives link at the bottom of this post for previous installments in this series.

Signs and Portents Everywhere…But of What?

by Seneca III

Interlude 4 — The coming of Floyd and the end times of nations.

The robbing, looting and burning, the beatings of people trying to defend their properties and the random shooting of innocents by both black and white BLM and Antifa scum in the US, supposedly on behalf of a dead thug and career criminal whom the media have turned into some sort of innocent saint, has nothing to do with the reasons for his arrest nor the circumstances of his death, which will, in due course, be openly dealt with by the courts.

[It has been reported that at the time of his arrest he was extremely violent and heavily under the influence of the drugs to which he was habituated. The coppers at first managed to get him into the squad car, but, being the large, strong, violent man that he was, he somehow managed to get out. No doubt extreme force was required to restrain him, and the coppers were not to know that he had an underlying heart condition and that kneeling on his neck for, in retrospect, several unnecessary minutes would cause partial asphyxiation resulting in a heart attack.]

That said, what any of this has to do with us in the UK is beyond rational explanation, as is the sight of Met Police officers being repeatedly attacked by the same primitive savages whom we have foolishly welcomed into this country in the name of multiculturalism and enrichment…

…and then ‘taking a knee’ at the feet of the same slavering, predominantly black mob…

…which was egged on by white co-conspirators such as this one…

…who I fervently hope will take that self-asphyxiation process to its ultimate, and for me, rewarding end.

Indeed, coppers such as those obsequiously kneeling, and their Common-Purposed superiors, disgust me to the extent that I almost vomited at the sight.

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Ten Rules for Politicians

Ten Rules for Politicians

by Michael Copeland

1.   Pretend only a minority of Muslims are of concern.
2.   Tell everyone they are warped misunderstanders.
3.   Tell everyone the Muslim clerics will help.
4.   Gain publicity at every Islamic holy event.
5.   Praise Muslims and Islam at every chance.
6.   Give Muslims positions of influence.
7.   Increase aid to Muslim countries.
8.   Pressure voters to pretend Muslims are no problem.
9.   Curb freedom of speech.
10.   Silently spend a fortune on counter-terrorism.
 

Hat tip: comment by PJG

Islam is Incompatible With Democracy

The following essay by Michael Copeland was originally published at LibertyGB, and has been updated by the author since then.

Islam is Incompatible With Democracy

by Michael Copeland

Sharia law, the European Court ruled,

“is incompatible with the fundamental principles of democracy”.

What is Sharia law? It is the body of rules which together define Islam. Fouad Belkacem, “Abu Imran” of Sharia4Belgium, helpfully explains:

“Sharia is Islam, to be clear: there is no difference between Islam and Sharia.”

Pause for a moment to take in the weighty import of these two statements. It is a serious one: Islam is incompatible with democracy. “Incompatible”, as we know, means “does not go together, will not mix, is at variance with”, and so on, as fox is to henhouse. The well-informed observant Muslim Anjem Choudary makes it clear:

“Democracy, liberalism, freedom, and so on need to be destroyed. … So be part of the project … of calling for the Sharia.”

What have Western leaders been doing giving room to a system that will not mix with Western freedoms, is at variance with domestic law and seeks to destroy it? It is a dire failure by them to uphold the constitution — our rules for how we are governed.

We in the West have grown accustomed to relying on the fundamental principles of democracy. Many of us who have never really thought it through erroneously assume that these are cast in concrete, and there is no need to be concerned about them or for them. This assumption is dangerously wrong. Democracy’s fundamental principles are not made of rock. Fought over, gathered together, discussed and agreed, they are written on paper in laws, and are expressed by being upheld. A wise lady wrote, “Love does not sit there like a stone. It has to be made anew, like bread.” Likewise, fundamental principles do not sit there like stones: they have to be upheld and defended.

Now a strange malaise has afflicted Western administrations. Curious to observe, some laws are not being upheld. In the UK the rights of peaceful assembly and freedom of expression were not upheld in Walthamstow in 2012 when the English Defence League’s demonstration, all properly arranged with the authorities beforehand, was left unprotected by the police who were present. The demonstrators’ rights were overridden. Further, and far more culpably, no action was taken against violent law-breakers — Muslims and Antifa — who threw missiles and prevented any speeches from being made.

Democracy died on September 1st”,

Paul Weston perceptively and prophetically declared to the demonstrators. Watching it die were those paid to keep it in good order. They have failed. These are failures of government. Paul Weston afterwards delivered the epitaph:

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José Ortega y Gasset on Self-Satisfaction and Specialization

Thomas Bertonneau’s latest essay discusses José Ortega y Gasset’s most well-known work.

José Ortega y Gasset on Self-Satisfaction and Specialization

by Thomas F. Bertonneau

The Revolt of the Masses (1930) by the Spanish philosopher José Ortega y Gasset (1883-1955), like many books openly critical of modern trends, was once celebrated and judged to be something of a contemporary classic, but it has gradually, over the last four or five decades, vanished from awareness even among the supposedly educated. I read it for the first time in the early 1970s when I pursued (rather fitfully, I confess) my undergraduate degree at the University of California, Los Angeles. The College Library possessed two copies, an indication of how widely the book circulated in the middle of the Twentieth Century. Were one to canvass today’s English or History faculties, familiarity with Ortega’s book would likely be non-existent; it would be a rare incident even if so much as the name Ortega registered with humanities professors in their thirties and early forties.

The Revolt nevertheless speaks to the present moment with increasing pertinence, as do many similar books of its day, such as Oswald Spengler’s Hour of Decision (1934) and Eric Voegelin’s New Science of Politics (1952), which likewise have lost all currency. The Revolt also describes those who know not of it and who think that knowledge is circumscribed by the syllabus of their graduate studies. The Revolt illuminates a remark made by Alain de Benoist and Charles Champetier in their Manifesto for a European Renaissance (2012): “Modernity has given birth to the most empty civilization mankind has ever known.” Two chapters of The Revolt offer themselves as especially relevant to the situation of the West in the second decade of the Twenty-First Century — “The Self-Satisfied Age” and “The Barbarism of Specialization.” First, however, a brief summary of Ortega’s general argument is in order.

The late Nineteenth Century, according to Ortega, saw the sudden rise in Europe of economies of abundance. This mounting wealth resulted, in the first part of the Twentieth Century, in mass man, a social and cultural phenomenon that adapted itself, but in no positive way, to the advent of material ease and comfort. Mass man reaped the benefits of a civilization to which he had in no way contributed, which he failed to understand, and which he took entirely for granted, identifying it as the natural background to his existence. By the power number alone, mass man, in Ortega’s phrase, intervenes everywhere, breaking down the hierarchical aspects of society and culture, while assimilating to himself — that is, to his limitation and incapacity — every institution. Mass man undertakes no projects, but contents himself with diversion. If he were to labor, it would be reluctantly, without commitment, and for the sake of diversion. Ortega defines mass man as “he whose life lacks any purpose, and simply goes drifting along.” This Homo novus has proliferated with such celerity that he overwhelmed any possibility of education. Thus, in Ortega’s words, “heap after heap of human beings have been dumped onto the historical scene at such an accelerated state, that it has been difficult to saturate them with traditional culture.” Mass man experiences a privative consciousness bereft of history, ignorant of the ancestors, and by tendency self-centered. He is egocentric in the extreme, in fact, but with the codicil that his ego remains at an infantile level of development.

A key to grasping mass man, Ortega argues, lies in the discovery of his most fundamental assumption concerning himself, namely that he is “exempt from restrictions.” Mass man also takes a stance of “radical ingratitude towards all that has made possible his existence,” a disposition related to his lack of any historical perspective or knowledge. Whereas “the ordinary man of past times was daily taught… elemental wisdom by the world about him,” because instability continually unbalanced that world; yet, “the new masses find themselves in the presence of a prospect full of possibilities, and furthermore, quite secure, with everything ready to their hands, independent of any previous efforts on their part.” This almost automatic proffering of goods and services in response to mere whim provokes in mass man “the psychology of the spoilt child.” The child of indulgence confidently presumes his priority over everyone else, and his superiority to anyone who thwarts, or attempts to thwart, him in his desires. He “makes no demands on himself, but contents himself with what he is, and is delighted with himself.” Ortega’s phrase — “full of possibilities” — requires qualification. The range of “possibilities” that interests mass man remains quite narrow. What one specimen of mass man wants, every other specimen of mass man also wants. Mass man brings an unprecedented conformity and homogeneity to his milieu.

These trends, including the abrupt dominance of this new, vague variety of human being, have expressed themselves, as Ortega puts it in one of his chapter titles, in “A Self-Satisfied Age.” Let it be said that the label that applied justly to the civilizational scene of Europe in 1930 applies no less justly, but with greater justice than ever, to the civilizational scene of North America ninety years later. Ortega could be sketching a portrait, for example, of the typical college freshman of 2020 in one of the state systems of (so-called) higher education, or of a self-declared “expert” prattling about this, that, or another thing on one of the cable news channels. The current chapter of modernity — or of “post-modernity,” as it preeningly calls itself — is undoubtedly ten times as self-satisfied, as entitled and narcissistic, as its precursor-chapter. What, then, are the basic characteristics of a “Self-Satisfied Age” or, rather, of the constituent personality of that Age? Ortega draws from his previous analysis three chief traits: “An inborn, root-impression that life is easy, plentiful, [and] without any grave limitations”; “contentment with himself [as he is that] leads [mass man] to shut himself off from any external court of appeal”; and a tendency “[to] intervene in all matters, imposing [his] vulgar views without respect or regard for others.” Ortega unites these traits, while emphasizing the third trait or vulgarity, under the damning etiquette of “spiritual barbarism.” Because “all life is the struggle, the effort to be itself,” and because mass man never struggles, but only revels in diversion, spirit or self has no inward grounds on which it might consolidate or exercise itself. It never appears.

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Signs and Portents Everywhere… But of What? (Part III)

Below is the most recent installment in Seneca III’s latest treatise. See the archives link at the bottom of this post for previous installments in this series.

Signs and Portents Everywhere…But of What?

by Seneca III

Part III — Of times past and modern parallels

Times can and do change drastically, often after great events that upturn the lives of vast numbers of people. And so it shall soon be for us as we fight our way out of this Covid debacle, an event which has been as badly mismanaged as was the advent and conduct of the Great War 1914-18, which saw the end of the Edwardian era and kick-started the 20th century.

I found this visual vignette on the Woodpile Report sometime last year (although the link no longer seems to work) and it has fascinated me ever since. Every time I look at it, it seems to encapsulate a time different from ours and yet in some ways not so distant or different despite being separated by nearly a century. No date came with it, but there are clues aplenty, and it provides an interesting look into the prescient mind and times of the graphic artist who committed it to posterity.

The artist went to some length to emphasize that the ‘boisson du jour’ was lemonade so we can assume that we are looking at a time during the period between 1920 and 1933. The Volstead Act[1] (ratified on January 16th 1919, came into force on January 29th 1920) was a statutory ban on the production, importation, transportation, and sale of alcoholic beverages designed to provide enforcement for the Eighteenth Amendment to the Constitution. The 21st Amendment, which repealed the 18th, was ratified on December 5th 1933… and a very Merry Christmas for America.

Starting in the top left-hand corner we see a small aircraft with what appears to be the aerodynamic characteristics of a house brick, despite the semi-streamlined overall shape. What purpose the mudguards were meant to serve is beyond me, although they do have a vague aerodynamic shape to them. The rear of the aircraft is obscured by the head of the woman in red, so we cannot determine what form of propulsion the artist had in mind. Also note that the cockpit/passenger cabin is fully enclosed and windowed. This does not provide any clues to the exact time as the first airplane with an enclosed cabin appeared in 1912, the Avro Type F, and during the 1920s there were many passenger aircraft with enclosed cabins.


AVRO Type F

The largest impediment to having closed cockpits/cabins was the material used to make the windows. Prior to Perspex becoming available in 1933, windows were either safety glass, which was heavy, or cellulose nitrate (i.e. guncotton), which yellowed quickly and was extremely flammable.

Hence we shall have to look for other clues if we wish to pin down the precise period, although the fact that the women are wearing goggles would suggest a time in the mid to late twenties, when the movement from open to enclosed cockpits was well afoot but open cockpits were still far from obsolete. The clothes the women are wearing[2] are a different matter, and very much of their time, so let us have a look at their outfits and see what we can determine there.

First, observe the waitress in the middle ground. Bearing in mind that as I am far from being an expert on haute couture, I will happily accept a different opinion on this subject from anyone who is au fait. The simple two-piece includes slacks (trousers), just as the two main characters are also wearing, and which prior to WWI were seriously frowned upon in certain circles. That and the rather butch hair-do the waitress is sporting clearly signal that post-war female emancipation had come to stay and, of course, the liberal application of rouge to women’s cheeks is very much a thing of that time.

That was that generation, so what now of ours, I wonder?

Back to the main theme

The two women in the foreground are using devices that were yet to come. The artist must have been very far-sighted to hypothesize in such a way… or was he or she simply looking at technical developments during that period and then extrapolating?

The arrival of mobile (cell) audio-phones, and then later with the addition of colour screens, was far in the future, in fact such speculation was only found in the realm of the lurid pulp science fiction of the time. It amazes me that he or she was not that far off in that prediction, fact when one considers that the technology extant then — headphones, a microphone, a flat screen (that was far, far in the future) and a transportable battery pack to power them — were all there before the days of Silicon Valley, electronics, lithium batteries and the consequent step-by-step miniaturization of everything through the development of solid-state architecture.

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