Joachim Kuhs on Israeli Sovereignty in the West Bank

Last Thursday I reported on the vote in the German Bundestag concerning Israeli sovereignty over a portion of the West Bank. The AfD (Alternative für Deutschland, Alternative for Germany) was the only party in the Bundestag that did not condemn Israel. All parties except the AfD submitted motions to the Bundestag session the previous day to deplore Israel’s alleged “annexation” of Judea and Samaria.

Joachim Kuhs is a member of the European Parliament for the AfD. The following video features his remarks on Israel and the West Bank.

Many thanks to MissPiggy for the translation, and to Vlad Tepes and RAIR Foundation for the subtitling:

Video transcript:

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Spengler on Militant Religiosity

“The present can only accomplish its purification by the erasure of its past.”

Below is the third of Thomas Bertonneau’s three-essay sequence on the crisis of modernity.

Spengler on Militant Religiosity

by Thomas F. Bertonneau

Oswald Spengler (1880-1936), the German historian and philosopher, devotes a suite of three chapters (VII, VIII, and IX) in his Decline of the West, Volume II (1922), to what he calls “The Problems of the Arabian Culture.” The third of these chapters, “Pythagoras, Mohammed, Cromwell,” explores the parallelisms that, in Spengler’s view, and in his use of the word, make these figures “contemporary” with one another. The same chapter also contains Spengler’s analysis of Puritanism, but not strictly in the sense of Calvinist doctrine, although he includes Calvinism in his discussion. Spengler views Puritanism as an inevitable phase of religion, one of doctrinal hardening and literalism in which a totalitarian impulse predominates. Puritanism has manifested itself in all the Great Cultures, as Spengler calls them, such as the Chinese, the Classical, and the Gothic. By “The Problems of Arabian Culture” Spengler does not mean to confine himself to a history of Monophysitism or Islam, although these come under his three-chapter remit. Spengler subsumes “Arabian Culture” under the larger category of “Magian Culture,” which embraces both Arabia Felix and Arabia Deserta but reaches far beyond them to aspects of the late Persian and Syriac societies, to the Hellenism of Alexandria, and even to the Iconoclastic centuries of Byzantium. The term Magian also reaches back in time to the late stages of Mesopotamian society. For Spengler, St. Augustine shares rather more with Islamic theology than he does, say, with St. Thomas and the Scholastics. For Spengler, the Hagia Sophia of Constantinople anticipates the mosque. To understand the chapter-sequence on “The Problems of Arabian Culture,” however, requires that Spengler’s often shocking and sometimes counter-intuitive pronouncements, like the ones just mentioned, take their place among the over-arching assumptions of The Decline.

Spengler’s opus impresses the first-time reader as a colossal improvisation. Its erudition and seeming formlessness put off many would-be explorers. Spengler’s basic propositions nevertheless lend themselves to summary. Spengler rejects the idea of a universal history. He recognizes no singular history but a number of histories in the plural, each one peculiar to its own Great Culture. Thus the Classical or Mediterranean Culture begins with the palace kingdoms of Mycenaean Greece and ends with the Severan Dynasty of the Late Second and Early Third Centuries. Indian Culture begins with the Vedas and ends with Buddhism. Western or “Faustian” Culture has its earliest glimmerings in the Eighth Century but really only leaps into being after the year 1000. Western Culture preserves a profound awareness of Classical Culture but this awareness implies, for Spengler, no actual continuity. Each Great Culture constitutes itself hermetically as an organic whole without debt to adjacent or precursor cultures. Borrowings are never essential, but only ornamental. Spengler emphasizes the organic character of culture. He regards each Great Culture as a living entity, whose mortality impends as soon as it comes to birth. Each Great Culture follows the same seasonal life-course — a vivacious and creative spring, a productive summer, a crisis-afflicted fall, and an increasingly inflexible winter. Spengler also makes a distinction between culture, as such, and civilization. Culture flourishes as the vital phase; civilization takes over as the mechanical phase, becoming more and more rigid until the machine stops.

Each Great Culture first expresses itself in a springtime outburst of religion. The Classical pantheon and associated cults already existed in late Mycenaean times; Homer and Hesiod signify a literate transformation of a long existing Apollonian worldview, as Spengler calls it. By the time of Septimius Severus (reigned 193-211), the Classical religion has become a syncretic henotheism, with one god in numerous guises, complete with a church-structure wedded to the state. Whereas the springtime paganism knew nothing of prejudice, the syncretic henotheism has codified itself as a set of compulsory dogmas. Spengler distinguishes between a Magian and a Gothic Christianity, which have little or nothing to do with one another. The latter appears with the building of the Lady Churches and with the blazing out of sacred polyphony. By the time of the Baroque, however, Catholicism has become the counterpart of syncretic henotheism. A living entity no longer, the Church distinguishes itself hardly at all from the array of explicitly secular institutions. As for Magian Christianity, Spengler classifies it as one of many apocalyptic movements that participate in the same mundial vision. These dispensations show themselves initially around the time of Alexander’s campaigns. Spengler writes in Vol. II, Chapter VIII, how “the world, as spread out for the Magian waking-consciousness, possesses a kind of extension that may be called cavern-like.” A “primary dualism” governs the world-cavern of this revelation: “The light shines through the cavern and battles the darkness.” The Magian Culture reaches its final, ossified phase when Mohammed issues his unalterable Koran and commences his coercive mission.

If social, spiritual, and intellectual rigor mortis belonged to the autumnal and hibernal chapters of the cultural life-course, this would not mean that earlier chapters exhibited no forecast of rigidification. Spasms of Puritanism occur in the vernal and estival chapters but show themselves as liable to suppression by the still-vivacious environments where they arise. The first name in the title of Spengler’s third of three chapters on “The Problems of Arabian Culture” is that of Pythagoras, whose person will be familiar to most readers through its association with the theorem of the right triangle. The lifetime of Pythagoras spans most of the Sixth Century BC, with scholarship locating his birth around 570 and his death around 495. The prevailing myth treats Pythagoras in an anodyne way: Philosopher, mystic, mathematician, vegetarian, discoverer of the cosmic harmony, and champion of animals. Pythagoras invited veneration from the Florentine Humanists and again from the French Symbolists as an idealist and altruist. The truth puts Pythagoras in quite a different light. “Pythagoras was not a philosopher,” Spengler writes; but rather, “he was a saint, prophet and founder of a fanatically religious society that forced its truths upon the people around it by every political and military means.” Croton, the Greek colony in Southern Italy where Pythagoras took up residence in middle life, raised an army under his regime that “in the bitter earnest of [its] gospel of duty duly wrecked gay Sybaris and branded it forever a city without morals.” What was that “gospel”? It consists of the “enthusiasms of a sober spirit, cold intensities, dry mysticism, [and] pedantic ecstasy.”

Pythagoreanism belongs under the category of Puritanism. Spengler defines Puritanism as a symptom of dour old-age: “It lacks the smile that had illumined the religion of the Spring… the moments of profound joy in life, the humour of life.” The destruction of Sybaris, around 510 BC, finds affirmation in both history and archaeology; the city suffered such violence that its survivors had to abandon it and take up residence elsewhere, as in Thurii. The wrath unleashed against Sybaris has lodged in the collective memory, Spengler speculates, “because it was the climax of a wild religious war… an explosion of the same hate that saw in Charles I and his gay Cavaliers not merely doctrinal error, but also worldly disposition as something that must be destroyed root and branch.” Furthermore, “A myth purified and conceptually fortified, combined with rigorous ethical precepts, imbued the Pythagoreans with the conviction that they would attain salvation before all other men.” The South-Italian cities that had come under the sway of the collective enthusiasm eventually found the furor too much to bear. Inspired by Spengler, the scholar Kurt von Fritz issued his book Pythagorean Politics in Southern Italy in 1940. Von Fritz pieces together a simultaneous multi-city uprising that in the space of a few days wreaked vengeance on the Pythagorean committees, burned down their lodges, and suppressed the fanatical portion of their following. Spengler notes that the Pythagorean writings, such as the Golden Tablets, make the promise to loyal adherents of elevation to godhood. That degree of self-satisfaction and self-righteousness could only — and soon — draw forth condign reaction.

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The AfD Was the Only Party in the Bundestag That Did Not Condemn Israel

Yesterday the German Bundestag voted on a resolution about Israel’s move to assert full sovereignty over a portion of Judea and Samaria, a.k.a. the West Bank. The AfD (Alternative für Deutschland, Alternative for Germany) was the only party that did not vote to condemn the Israeli decision.

In the following video Dr. Anton Friesen speaks on the floor of the Bundestag for the AfD. Many thanks to MissPiggy for the translation, and to Vlad Tepes for the subtitling:

The following article from Politically Incorrect was also translated by MissPiggy:

Debate on Two-State Solution in the Middle East

AfD is the only party to reject condemnation of Israel in the Bundestag

July 1, 2020

All parties except the AfD have submitted motions to the Bundestag session this afternoon to condemn Israel for the alleged “annexation” of Judea and Samaria, the home of the Jewish people. The AfD will be the only party to reject all these motions.

The first parliamentary director of the AfD, Bernd Baumann, said at the press conference this morning: “The position of the AfD is that we do not give advice to Israel from the AfD. Given our basic historical position, we will not give advice to Israel.” The AfD will therefore be the only party in the German Bundestag that does not condemn Israel.

The MEP for the AfD, Joachim Kuhs, already described on PI-NEWS why Israeli sovereignty in Judea and Samaria is not an “illegal occupation”. In a recent video from Brussels, Kuhs, who is a member of the AfD board and chairman of the “Christians in the AfD”, said: “ARD and ZDF want viewers to believe that the Israeli provinces of Judea and Samaria are ‘illegally occupied territories’. Last August, I was able to visit Judea and Samaria with a delegation of ‘Jews in the AfD’ and form my own opinion.”

Below are excerpts from an article published by Arutz Sheva about the debate over Judea and Samaria in the Bundestag and the historical background for it:

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Céline Pina: “This Madness is Contaminating us All”

[I had to get another injection in my eye this afternoon, so I’m running on only three cylinders this evening. Nevertheless, I’ll do what I can to get some posts up.]

Céline Pina is a French politician and essayist who is known for her vigorous criticism of Islam. In the following video Ms. Pina discusses the ubiquitous torquing of language that has become a mainstay of political correctness in the West.

Many thanks to MissPiggy for the translation, and to Vlad Tepes and RAIR Foundation for the subtitling:

Video transcript:

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Terror at a Paris Shopping Center

Earlier today an unidentified gunman carrying what was described as a Kalashnikov appeared at a shopping center in Paris. The unfortunate gentleman, presumably suffering from some form of mental illness, reportedly shouted “Allahu Akhbar!” (which is Arabic for “Down with systemic racism!”) while terrorizing shoppers.

The shopping center was evacuated. Some witnesses said they heard what sounded like gunshots, but no injuries were reported. Police were unable to find the gunman, and then inexplicably called off the search for the suspect.

The following video is a report on the incident by the German vlogger Unblogd. Many thanks to MissPiggy for the translation, and to Vlad Tepes and RAIR Foundation for the subtitling:

Below are excerpts from the accompanying article at RAIR Foundation:

Paris: Police Inexplicably Call Off Search for ‘Allahu Akhbar’ Gunman at Les Quatre Temps Shopping Center

by Amy Mek

This morning, June 30, a manhunt was deployed in the business district of La Défense, at a shopping center just outside Paris, Les Quatre Temps (also known as 4-Temps). Police called off the investigation with the unnerving explanation that they could not find a suspect.

In 2015, this specific shopping center was singled out as a terror target in video released by Al Shabaab, the same terrorist group that killed 60 people in a Kenyan mall in 2013.

A shopper at Les Quatre Temps first reported that he had spotted a man carrying a machine gun around 9:30 am “confirming what several witnesses report.” Additionally, according to International news organization ok diario, “others claimed to have seen someone throw a glass bottle on the ground to the cry of ‘allahu akbar’.”

One female witness at the shopping center “heard explosions resembling gunshots”. She adds, “There was a crowd movement then everyone ran out.” Another witness named Olivia who is employed a Cafe in the center agrees, “I heard two shots. I was panicked. I went out and ran. “

The military and police completely locked the entire area, including La Defense train station and evacuated terrified shoppers who can be scene rushing out with their hands raised over the heads.

According to a news correspondent citing a police source, the man on the loose is “athletically built, wearing a black mask and is carrying a machine gun.”

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Rasmus Paludan Bunged Into Chokey

The Danish “Islamophobe” Rasmus Paludan is well-known to regular readers of this site, thanks to the dozens of videos of his street demonstrations that Vlad Tepes has uploaded over the past four or five years. Vlad has lost a lot of channels during that time, but he recently re-uploaded last September’s interview with Mr. Paludan in Quebec. This time it’s on the 3Speak platform (in five parts: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5), so it’s less likely to disappear from the web.

Denmark used to be bastion of free speech. Thirteen years ago, when I first started paying attention to Danish politics, there was a greater degree of free speech in Denmark than anywhere else in Western Europe. And maybe there still is — but in the years since then, free speech in Western Europe has all but disappeared.

Rasmus Paludan was recently convicted of “racism” in a Danish court, and will spend a month in jail if his planned appeal is unsuccessful. Below are two articles about the verdict, first from Reuters:

Danish far-right party leader sentenced to jail on racism and defamation

COPENHAGEN (Reuters) — The leader of Danish far-right party Stram Kurs, lawyer Rasmus Paludan, was disbarred from the legal profession and sentenced to three months in jail on Thursday after being found guilty of racism.

Stram Kurs (Hard Line) was close to getting into parliament in the last election in Denmark with a policy based on banning Islam and deporting hundreds of thousands of Muslims.

Paludan first came to public attention in 2017 when he started making anti-Muslim Youtube videos. His stunts have included publicly burning the Koran, sometimes wrapped in bacon, in what he said was a tribute to free speech.

Paludan was sentenced to 14 days of conditional imprisonment in 2019 for racist speech. He will now face one month of imprisonment with two additional months of suspended sentence after being found guilty of 14 different accounts of racism, defamation and hazardous driving.

Additionally, as part of his sentence, Paludan was disbarred for three years, had his driver’s licence suspended for one year and was fined around 40,000 Danish crowns ($6,012.23), the district court said in a statement.

Paludan denied all charges.

The second report is from the BBC:

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Malign Foreign Influences in Dutch Mosques

The Dutch Parliament has concluded a study on the influence of non-free countries on Muslims in the Netherlands. Many thanks to FouseSquawk for translating this article from De Dagelijkse Standaard:

Parliamentary commission concludes Dutch mosques influenced by non-free countries

by Michael van der Galien
June 25, 2020

The parliamentary commission that conducted an investigation into the funding of mosques and Islamic schools has concluded that they are influenced through “financiers from non-free lands who want to exercise their political-religious influence in the Netherlands.” This concerns “fundamentalist messages that reject the core values of our society.”

The Tweede Kamer needed a commission in order to conclude that? Literally, everybody knew all along that there were problems, but oh, oh, the Second Chamber had to first investigate it thoroughly, and only then could they could say it.

The most important criticism is directed towards Kuwait, Qatar and Saudi Arabia. There imams are trained and indoctrinated with an extreme version of Islam, and then sent out to the Netherlands. “Muslim communities are also bombarded with strict religious messages via social media.”

The commission also whines about Turkey— The Diyanet (Turkish agency for religious affairs) is said to “hold a political grip on the visitors to the mosques and the Turkish Dutch”. If that was true, then you still ask yourself what would be illegal about it. It is completely logical that a country wants to have contact with its citizens, even if they live elsewhere. The Netherlands does no different. And the message from Turkish Diyanet imams is really never anti-democratic and never affects the fundamentals of the democratic constitutional state. Perhaps the connections with Turkey are underscored, but yes, in the Netherlands, we have allowed the people to have two passports. So it is logical and even defensible that Turkey contacts its people and treats them as Turks. Which they always are.

As regards the anti-democratic, anti-West messages that are preached in Arab and Moroccan mosques: This must naturally be discussed directly with the countries. Possibilities to stop it must be looked at… if the possibilities are legal.

Because yes, in the Netherlands, we have religious freedom. Foreigners can be influenced by the content of religious leaders’ speeches.

Oh no, does Michael really write now that they are free and must be free?

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The ADL’s “Task Force on Middle East Minorities”: A Con Job?

Below is David Boyajian’s latest report on the persistent animosity of the Anti-Defamation League towards Armenians.

The ADL’s “Task Force on Middle East Minorities”: A Con Job?

by David Boyajian
June 19, 2020

Hardly anyone — Jewish or otherwise — believes that the Anti-Defamation League (ADL) genuinely cares about the welfare of Christian, Muslim, and other non-Jewish minorities in the Middle East.

After all, contrary to its claim to be a civil/human rights champion and “secure… fair treatment for all,” the ADL is essentially a political organization.

So when it launched its so-called Task Force on Middle East Minorities (TFOMEM) in late 2018, I suspected a political con job.

TFOMEM says it will spotlight “human rights offenses committed against minority communities in the Middle East.”

That sounds bizarre, given that the ADL has itself committed human rights offenses against minorities and others right here in America.

Spying on Minorities

In 1992-3, police raided ADL offices in San Francisco and Los Angeles.

The ADL had a “private spy operation that authorities alleged crossed the line into illegal territory,” reported the L.A. Times.

ADL operatives were surveilling hundreds of minority, civil rights, labor, and media organizations and associated individuals. Among the targeted minority groups: NAACP, Asian Law Caucus, Latin American Support Committee, Arab-American Anti-Discrimination Committee, Filipino Organization Committee, and Young Koreans United.

ADL spy Tom Gerard was a rogue San Francisco police officer linked to Latin American death squads. He and his undercover ADL sidekick, Roy Bullock, called themselves “the kings of garbage” for scouring people’s trash for private material.

ADL agents spied on American opponents of Apartheid in South Africa and passed information to its government — hardly the conduct of a civil/human rights organization.

Narrowly escaping indictment by the San Francisco D.A. — who was reportedly under political pressure — the ADL still had to pay $50,000 to the city.

The ADL also settled civil rights lawsuits brought by victims of its snooping.

ADL Genocide Hypocrisy

In friendlier days, Israel and Turkey recruited the ADL and organizations such as the American Jewish Committee to deny/diminish the Armenian Genocide committed by Turkey from 1915-23.

These Jewish organizations and Israel also colluded with Turkey to defeat Armenian Genocide resolutions in the U.S. Congress.

Disgusted by the ADL’s genocide/Holocaust hypocrisy, in 2007-8 a dozen Massachusetts cities and the umbrella Massachusetts Municipal Association expelled the ADL’s sanctimoniously-named No Place for Hate program. This made national and international headlines.

The ADL has never apologized to Armenians. ADL CEO Jonathan Greenblatt’s 2016 acknowledgment of the Armenian Genocide came in a mere blog post and only after decades of deceit.

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We’re Only Trying to Get a Little Peace

The following report has more details on the historic peace agreement between the Chechens and the North Africans of Dijon, which was arrived at after intense negotiations by imams at a mosque in Quétigny.

Many thanks to MissPiggy for the translation, and to Vlad Tepes and RAIR Foundation for the subtitling:

Video transcript:

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A New Nationalist Movement in Italy

The word “fascist” is one of the most abused terms in modern political discourse. It is constantly thrown about with wild abandon, and is frequently applied to anyone who deviates even a nanometer from the progressive agenda of international socialism. Needless to say, I have been designated a fascist on many occasions.

The Italian party Forza Nuova, however, truly is neo-fascist. They are unabashed admirers of Benito Mussolini, and espouse an ideology based on Il Duce’s fascism of the 1920s and ’30s.

In preparing for this post I poked around on Forza Nuova’s websites. The party’s positions are what one would expect, and I found myself agreeing with it on several points, notably its pro-life position and its policies on immigration. Unlike the Nordic versions of National Socialism, there seemed to be little or no Jew-hatred in its online materials.

There has recently been a split in Forza Nuova. The (former) U.S. coordinator, Francesco Dotro, emailed me a few weeks ago and asked for my help notifying the English-speaking world of the formation of a new party, the Rete, out of disaffected portions of Forza Nuova.

We live in a time of unprecedented assault on nationalism, sovereignty, and national identity. I consider it important that nationalists be able to communicate with one another, given that they are cancelled, banned, shunned, shut down, and otherwise inhibited from publicizing their views in most online media.

For that reason I am posting the message below from Francesco Dotro. My willingness to allow him to speak should not be construed to mean that I agree with any or all of the Rete’s positions — far from it. Posting his message should not be taken to mean that I endorse it. I simply assume that readers of Gates of Vienna are intelligent enough to decide for themselves whether the arguments made by the new Italian nationalists have any merit.

“But Baron,” I hear you say, “think of what this will do to your reputation!”

As I have said many times before: I spit on the grave of my reputation. And, in this particular case, I hope to earn a reputation as someone who is willing to let dissident voices be heard. Unlike, say, Facebook and Twitter.

La Rete (The Network)

by Francesco Dotro

As of early May of this year a major split has occurred in Forza Nuova, a nationalist party in Italy which was founded and led by Roberto Fiore. For a period of time now it has been felt that the leadership in Rome has strayed from the beliefs the Party was founded on. Due to political differences, it is believed that 75% of current membership have left, along with two of the three vice secretaries. Supporting groups such as Solidarietà Nazionale, Associazione Evita Peron, and Lega Della Terra have also joined in the exodus. The choice was not an easy one, as many members have been involved since the beginning. They all have weathered the battles together and have held the torch of Nationalism through the years.

Out of this the membership has decided not to end the battle for freedom, and to continue to fight for the preservation of the culture and future of Italy. It has formed and given birth to the Rete Delle Comunita Forzanoviste. This is a temporary — or rather, interim — organization being utilized to bring Nationalists throughout Italy together in a common cause. A new party will be formed on the Fall of this year. Already there have been discussions, with new groups joining along as well as old members returning. There is a feeling of great enthusiasm and hope that the Rete (Network) will forge ahead and provide solutions for today’s problems in Italy and Europe as a whole.

What is the Rete?

The Rete is a network of militant communities active all over Italy. These communities have decided to form a new nationalist movement with a common organization and style of action. The old nationalist associations seem to be outdated and unable to solve new problems. On the other end, the social situation is changing dramatically in our country. The majority of people are angry with the globalists, and they have increased in number, but they are ideologically confused. They understand — or better yet — feel the system is totally wrong, but they have no idea of how to change it, let alone what to build upon its ashes. This means that the Rete will have to find new methods and elaborate a modern strategy, at the cultural level as well as in the streets. The Rete will work for the birth of a Nationalist Bloc together with other patriotic groups.

When did it start, and what are its goals?

It started on May 8th, a day dedicated to St. Michael the Archangel, chosen as the protector of all militant patriots. The Rete is formed by hundreds of activists with good discipline and experience. The first step was to give the Rete a solid organization: a centralized leadership — the Segreteria Nazionale — consisting of a team of both young and old people. It will also incorporate a number of political “commissions” to analyze specific aspects of the struggle (students, foreign policy, ideology, etc.) and technical “offices” with specific tasks (graphic, legal, media, social and recruiting).

The Rete has several so called “satellites” or parallel organizations. Solidarietà Nazionale is active in collecting food and helping poor Italians with food distribution (in contrast with the privileges accorded to immigrants). The Evita Peron Association is the women’s front, active against gender propaganda; it also takes care of a Summer camp for children and might soon start homeschooling, (quite uncommon in Italy, so far). The Lega Della Terra is for the peasants and farmers, and our young activists are forming a Rete Studentesca in the schools. We plan to form specific social cells in different categories, such as truck drivers, teachers, etc.

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Peace For Our Time

The war between the Chechens and the North Africans in Dijon is over. Imams representing the two sides hammered out a peace agreement at a mosque in the Quétigny district.

Below are two videos about this momentous peace accord. Many thanks to Oz-Rita for the translations, to MissPiggy for the timing, and to Vlad Tepes for the subtitling:

The first video is a news report on the agreement from French television:

Julien Odoul is a French politician who began his career as a socialist, and now serves as the regional president of Rassemblement National (formerly Front National) in Bourgogne Franche-Comté.

In the second video, Mr. Odoul gives his view of the peace agreement reached in Dijon:

Video transcript #1:

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One Year Later

Today is the first anniversary of my wife Dymphna’s death. The future Baron is here, and he and I are going to venture out into the rain and pick some flowers from her flowerbeds (I see coreopsis, coneflower, butterfly weed, and various other blooms I don’t know the names of). We’re planning to meet some friends at the churchyard and put the flowers on her grave.

So posting may be light today.

I posted a photo of Dymphna during last month’s fundraiser, and said I thought it would be the last one. However, I decided to add one more, and you can see it at the top of this post.

The occasion was the baptism of the future Baron in the late 1980s, when he was still a rug rat. He held up pretty well until his mother lowered him over the font to get sprinkled. He got a little upset, but never started to cry. At the left is the late Bishop Charles Vaché.

The original is blurry, since it was taken indoors without a flash. I couldn’t make it any sharper than that.

Dymphna probably told the you following story at some point, but I’ll tell it again. It happened in the parish hall after the baptism. The bishop was filling out the entry in the baptism book. He wanted to enter the date, and said, “What day is it?”

Dymphna was nearby, and, being a good Catholic girl, responded promptly: “St. Joseph’s Feast Day.”

The bishop waited politely, holding his pen poised. And waited. And waited. Dymphna had moved on into the kitchen, not realizing that she had baffled the bishop.

Finally, someone else told him it was March 19.

*   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *   *

And that was my wife. There was no one else quite like her.

Have a blessed day, everyone.

Identity

Our Israeli correspondent MC has some thoughts on socialism, Black Lives Matter, the ancient Hebrews, and related topics.

Those who claim that socialism will work ‘this time around’, and that the previous iterations failed because they did not implement socialism properly, may have a point. The National Socialism of the Third Reich was eerily sound and stable, and in all truth, it was brought down only by the unsound and unstable socialism of Joseph Stalin.

The Communist version of socialism never works, probably more because of what it lacks, than what it espouses. Communism (and many other forms of socialism) lack the warmth of heart that humans need to survive.

National Socialism was about being German, and on the whole Germans loved it. It enhanced their identity, their oneness, and they were thus able to express a warmth to other Germans. In Stalin’s Russia, everyone outside of one’s family circle was a potential enemy.

In this we can see the roots of the politics of racism. To a German Nazi, a non-German (or a Jew/Slav/Gypsy) was not automatically part of the comfortable clique, but for a Russian, there was no comfortable clique at all.

I came across a photograph on the internet the other day. It was on a forum and the poster was asking if anybody knew anything about this photo that had been found in an old box.

I am in that photo, and I remember being given five minutes’ notice by the gunnery officer. I had seen on daily orders that there was a photo session for the gunnery team, but I was a specialist, only part of the gunnery team for shore bombardment, my role being to do the math behind offsets and deflections (no computers or calculators in those days). What had not been made clear was that my ship had won the fleet gunnery trophy and the fleet shore bombardment trophy, so I was included.

The photo got me remembering the insularity of the ship’s company within the midst of all the other ships in the Royal Navy. Us and Them.

This it seems to me is why ‘racism’ is just a natural part of human life, and to turn Racism into a political thumbscrew is absolute folly.

Communism is unstable because it cannot provide for stable relationships. It cannot provide a ship’s company. It cannot provide a team that will work together and have confidence in each other. I was missing, I was searched out, and I took my place in the photo so that the team was complete and the photo meaningful.

If I had thought that my fellow crew members would rat on me for the slightest political incorrectness, I would have had to have been more careful and calculating — or suffer the consequences.

When I am accused of ‘racism’, it is as if my place in the team has been erased and my contribution excreted. The idea of racism with its sibling Islamophobia (and yes, even in some cases anti-Semitism) removes the ‘warmth of heart’ referred to above, and which is vitally necessary for the effective functioning of humanity together. Any fear of ‘racism’ is going to produce division.

Legitimate criticism of Jews, Jewishness and Israel do not constitute anti-Semitism, but picking out Jews for unbalanced criticism does. It is fine to criticise the so called ‘occupation’ if you also include all the other instances of occupation around the world, Tibet, Königsberg (Kaliningrad), Spanish Morocco, to name but a few. Israel was granted to Jews in 1922, and all nations who have signed up for the United Nations Charter have also signed up for article 80 of that Charter, which brings the 1922 Mandate for Palestine into the Charter — indeed, it could be argued that under international law, it is Jordan that has ‘occupied’ Israeli land (see article 25 of the Mandate).

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The Treaty of Trianon, One Hundred Years Later


Suleiman

The Treaty of Trianon, which dismembered the state of Hungary after the Great War, came into force exactly one hundred years ago today. Hungary and the Western Allies signed the instrument at the Grand Trianon Palace in Versailles; hence its name.

Hungary ended up losing two-thirds of its territory under the terms of the treaty, which stranded more than 40% of its population outside the borders of Hungary without anyone having to move.

Our Hungarian correspondent CrossWare has translated the following essay about the Treaty of Trianon, which relates Trianon to the earlier Muslim invasion, from the conservative portal PestiSracok.hu:

Suleiman was also present at the Trianon execution attempt

by László Kovács Vésey
May 25, 2020

Like when a man is beaten down with bat, so was the Trianon peace dictatorship: he falls to his knees, the world spins around him, and he doesn’t even understand what happened to him. To date, we have not recovered from it, either as a country or as a people. Those who demand that we at last leave this Trianon problem behind us and deal instead with the future do not take note of reality, because the past cannot be left behind unfinished. Trianon itself is a good example of this, as it has not fallen into our head without antecedents. Even a hundred years ago, the unprocessed past, our own omissions, and the fruits of the trickery of our enemies ripened together.

In today’s eyes it is almost inconceivable that Hungary came to the end of the Middle Ages as a sparingly stable and unified country, one of the leading powers in Europe. Even if the nobles and lords intervened at times in the king’s affairs and were able to stir up internal strife, no one could question the existence of a unified royal power. The kingdom had serious reserves of power, and was rich in precious metals, ores, and salt, not to mention food. Hungary had one and a half times as many inhabitants as England or Poland, two and a half times as many as the Czech Republic, and we had a decisive influence on the life of Central and Eastern Europe and the Balkans. There was no mention of a united Germany and Italy at that time; France was working on the creation of a centralized kingdom, just as a similar process took place in Spain after the success of the Reconquista. Besides ourselves, the latter two states were real military powers in that era.

It may even be considered a vagary of fate that in the immediate vicinity of this Hungary, which was a great power in all respects, the Ottoman Empire, which surpassed the strength of all European countries, had arisen. To this day there is no consensus among historians as to whether we would have been able to defend ourselves, but if we had, it would have required unparalleled self-discipline and conscious unity for two centuries from the king, nobles, and serfs. We lost the inevitable clash, but the Turks did not have enough strength to swallow our entire country. Thus, we did not sink into the Balkans (Transylvania, Partium and the South, after Trianon), but in terms of population, nothing worse could have happened to us. For two centuries our country became a battleground, with marches of the ever-increasing Ottoman, Habsburg, and Transylvanian armies regularly passing through our territory, requisitioning the peasantry that remained after taxation and double taxation. And if only they had just taken the taxes!

We Have Suffered a Disastrous Destruction

The Ottoman looting of the rural populations was accompanied by a significant extinction of the population and the destruction of the settlement structure. The whole countryside was depopulated, and many villages disappeared forever. If we look at the map of present-day Hungary, we can see that there are still only rare settlements in the Great Plain. During the uncertain period of occupation, instead of defenseless villages, people concentrated in a few swollen market towns and settled on large-scale animal husbandry, which was more sustainable in terms of possible escape, rather than farming. For this reason, there are settlements with a larger population and sparsely populated areas in the Great Plain, and the instances of single standalone farms are also rooted in this fact. But the Hungarian population remained at least partially here.


Hungary’s settlement density — the footprint of the Ottoman Turks is still visible today (source: terport.hu)

Muslim conquerors killed a large number of people and drove the enslaved Hungarians in endless columns to Istanbul and then sold them to various corners of the empire. During the Turkish conquest of 1521-1568, the Fifteen Years’ War of 1591-1606, the Austro-Turkish War of 1663-1664, and the expulsion of the Turks between 1683 and 1699, we suffered immeasurable horrors, probably the most brutal genocide in Europe in the last thousand years. At that time the Hungarians of Szerémség disappeared from the Hungarian majority of Temesköz, but by the end of the Turkish expulsion, the Hungarian population of Baranya, Tolna, Somogy counties and Partium had largely disappeared. These flat areas were the main terrain of the movements, so their populations became extinct, which in the vast majority of cases meant the Hungarian population.

Our Numbers Were Dwindling, While Everybody Else Was Thriving

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