Is China Going to Trigger a World War?

Our Bangkok correspondent H. Numan sends his take on the ChiCom flu and related matters.

Is China going to trigger a world war?

by H. Numan

We don’t quite know (yet) what caused the Chinese virus. Probably it comes from an infected bat, butchered and sold for food on an extremely unhygienic open air market. I know all about street markets. We have plenty of them in Thailand. Only with some standards of hygiene. You cannot butcher on the spot for example. In China, no such rule. Hygiene was never butchered. You can’t butcher what ain’t there, right?

We hear plenty of silly conspiracy theories these days. I get really sick of all the nonsense people dump online about Bill Gates, Soros and NWO. If aforementioned were only 5% as effective as those really dumb people claim, they would have achieved their goals a long time ago.

Another theory is that this Chinese virus didn’t start on a market, but in a nearby laboratory. Not impossible, but highly unlikely. Given that the POTUS makes such claims, I very humbly have to debunk it. I attended the NBC (Nuclear, Biological and Chemical warfare) school in the army. My instructor began by telling us how truly horrible those weapons are and how little we can do against it. Actually only against N weapons. Only within the army itself, and with very limited effect. Forget the civilian population. Y’all gonna die. Sorry about that.

It is technically impossible to prevent. We simply don’t have the resources for it. What we learned is how to detect it, and how to clean up yourself and your equipment after an N or C attack. There is no protection against B weapons at all. None whatsoever.

He told us that compared with chemical weapons, nukes are just firecrackers. Chemical weapons are almost innocent compared with biological weapons. All three are the stuff of horrors. You even imagine how truly horrid they are, not even in your worst nightmares.

A nuke explodes, that is it. Huge damage, and for a limited time, radiation. You can treat survivors immediately, and some infrastructure will remain intact. Large scale chemical attacks (most of them) cover large areas for weeks up to months. Whole areas or even entire countries will biologically die. Most life dies. Plants, insects and animals. Everything. For example, a large scale chemical attack on military installations in Germany would basically exterminate all life in central Europe. The unlucky survivors would slowly die of starvation and lack of medical facilities. Even clearing paths to walk on safely would be a huge effort. Months later gas would still stick to fences, leaves, in puddles, in houses and in cellars. Merely touching it would kill you. All life, plant life, insects and animals would have to be re-introduced to start life again. Forget about restarting civilization. Europe would be a literal valley of death.

The worst of all are biological weapons. This Chinese virus is relatively mild. Moderately contagious, but not very deadly. Yet this relatively mild virus spread like wildfire around the globe. The real danger is in overloading the medical system. Once you catch it, you need to be hospitalized. We simply don’t have that many hospitals or equipment to help everyone. That’s why this pandemic is so deadly and dangerous.

Again, this is a fairly mild virus. Imagine — better not do that — something designed in a lab that’s not so innocent and much more contagious. Such a virus would not be easy to counter. Designing a deadly virus is one thing. Designing one that only kills what you want or to have an antidote for your own population is quite another. Even if a vaccine is possible, inoculating 1.5 billion people is a massive undertaking.

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Quiz: Who is Being Referred To?

Quiz: Who is Being Referred To?

Compiled by Michael Copeland

No stronger retrograde force exists in the world. — Winston Churchill

…utterly incompatible with civilised society. — David Hume

…they beat out each other’s brains from generation to generation. — John Wesley

It is the principal cause of the decadence so visible today in [their] world — Alexis de Tocqueville

…undistinguishing and exterminating war… against all the rest of mankind. The essence of his doctrine was violence and lust: to exalt the brutal over the spiritual part of human nature. — John Quincy Adams, sixth president of the United States

…ferociously intolerant. — George Bernard Shaw

…the most fatal enemies of Civilization, Liberty, and Truth, which the world has yet known. — Sir William Muir

…the enemies of civilization. — Theodore Roosevelt

…unspiritual, concerned to win the empire of the world. —Bertrand Russell

It has always been about hate. It has always been about violence… a militant cult that is based on violence — Amil Imani

[They] refuse our culture and try to impose their culture on us. — Oriana Fallaci

There never was such scum as these people. — Lord Weidenfeld

…their systematic criminalization of free speech; their suppression of inquiry and creativity; and their unending intertribal fights — are the reasons their people have remained in the seventh century. — Uzay Bulut, Turkish journalist

…a unified message of triumphalism, otherworldliness, and religious hatred — Sam Harris

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Happy New Year from Thailand

Our Bangkok correspondent H. Numan sends this report on the coronavirus in Thailand

Happy New Year from Thailand

by H. Numan

Folks, I say it for the last time: Happy New Year! In Thailand we celebrate New Year three times: the Western New Year on 31 Dec-1 Jan, Chinese New Year in February, and finally Thai New Year or Songkran from 12-15 April. We expats sometimes irreverently call it ‘the annual culling of stupid Thais’.

You probably wonder why. Songkran is celebrated with lots of water and almost as much booze. The water splashing and fights are well known all around the world. It started as a ceremony where the elderly got sprinkled with water out of respect and evolved into a no-holds-barred fight where anything goes. I’ve seen people attaching hoses to fire hydrants and hosing down passing motor cycles, cars and buses. It’s also great fun to empty a bucket filled with water and ice over a passing motorcycle. This goes on from early 12 until late 15 April, in some cities even later. Non-stop. Same goes for boozing up. Getting splashed or hosed down goes for anyone on the streets, no matter what. You may be wearing a tuxedo or an expensive laptop, it doesn’t matter. Being on the streets makes you fair game.

Thailand has the second most dangerous traffic in the world. Only Libya is worse. Songkran is one of the two ‘seven deadly days’ periods, the other period being Western New Year. During those deadly days the death toll rises to +400 for each period, with matching numbers of seriously injured people. The government does what it can to alleviate these horrendous figures, with limited success.

This year, however, will be very different. All public festivities have been canceled. For the first time in 25 years I can probably walk the streets unmolested… I don’t like Songkran, and always stay indoors (because of the indiscriminate hosing of water). This year we are in total lockdown, so everybody has to stay indoors. It might even be a limited blessing in disguise: The death toll due to the coronavirus is so far 32, relatively low compared to most nations. Make that 60 in the near future. Very likely the number of traffic deaths will be much lower, maybe as low as 200. Which is a big win. But at what cost…

Thailand is in total lockdown. Air travel in and out of the country is completely suspended. Only repatriation flights leave the country. Travelers have to have medical certificates in order to board. Repatriation flights with Thais are coming in. Those on board have to disembark and go into quarantine for 14 days. Most comply, but not everybody. We had a bit or a row when a group of travelers refused to go into quarantine. The airport police had to detain them, and a general was called in to calm down the situation. A few managed to escape during the scuffle and are now on the most-wanted list of the Royal Thai police.

When I say lockdown, I mean it. Several provinces have declared internal lockdowns. Only locals are allowed in, nobody else. Pattaya (more exactly: Chonburi province) is one of them. The otherwise bustling city looks almost deserted. There is a nationwide curfew from 10pm until 4am, rigidly enforced by the police. Penalties are Bt. 40,000 and/or two years in hell jail. That fine can be translated into $4,500 or €4,000 to give you an idea. Bt. 40,000 is a pretty good salary, unattainable for most Thais. You have to wear a face mask in public. Bt. 100,000 if you don’t. Oh, something else that won’t raise the spirits, literally. An alcohol ban from 8-16 April. Large shops and government offices enforce strict 1.5 meter space at checkouts. Visitors are all checked for temperature. Sometimes that can lead to funny readings, if the temperature is taken right under an air conditioning vent. Seriously: if your temperature really is 32°C, you have bigger problems than a possible virus.

A few people even committed suicide due to the virus. Three ladies jumped of a bridge or bridges over the Chao Phraya river in Bangkok. Two of them drowned, one was able to be rescued.

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“I Renounced Islam”

The following article is an updated version of one that was published by LibertyGB in 2014.


Amal Farah

“I Renounced Islam”

by Michael Copeland

I renounced Islam, so my family think I should die” is the heading of the article in the Telegraph by Harriet Alexander. The article illustrates the way readers’ thoughts can be subtly steered towards desired conclusions. Both the journalist and the featured ex-muslim woman she quotes have an interest in not directing the spotlight too strongly on Islam. They both know that this can be the excuse for “repercussions”.

Straight away in the heading there are two influences at work. First the spotlight is put on “my family”, influencing the reader away from supposing that the matter might have something to do with Islam — it is a family thing, you see. This is a standard deflection, often used. Secondly, the wording says, “I should die”. That is a slightly vague and open statement, a whole lot less dramatic than “I should be killed”.

Keeping attention on her family, the article goes on to say,“her family felt she deserved to die.” There you are: it was what they “felt”. The Western reader is inclined to consider that with some loving kind encouragement the family could be influenced to change their feelings. First feelings, then beliefs: “They believe you deserve to die”: the family “believe” this is what she deserves. Silently it is left open to the reader to hope that with the right pastoral care the family could be brought round to more charitable and humane beliefs. Nothing is offered to rule this out.

The pressure is on, though: we next learn that not just the family, but the community shares the same belief about leaving Islam: “within my community, that’s a capital offence,” she said. “They believe you deserve to die.” This is more demanding: there will have to be much more persuasion work done with the whole community to help them modify their beliefs. Steady! There is more detail: “In the eyes of the deeply-conservative Somali community… renouncing Islam was an act potentially punishable by death.” Now we know: it is the “deeply-conservative Somali” community. That is better: we can breathe a sigh of relief: it evidently does not include the presumed modern, fashionable part of the Somali community. Besides, look again, renouncing Islam is only “potentially” punishable by death. More sighs of relief: that really takes the pressure off, doesn’t it? “She is adamant that it is not a problem with Islam…” There you are: of course, it is not Islam: she is adamant. It is that deeply-conservative Somali community with its feelings and beliefs. The only snag is that the phrase “it is not a problem with Islam” has the ring of being a standard untrue disclaimer. As we shall see, this matter is indeed very much “a problem with Islam”.

Now that the pressure is removed we can be fed some handy distractions: “If you look at the Old Testament, there are some shocking things there.” This is another standard technique — “You lot do it, too” — known by its Latin name tu quoque, “you also”. Two observations are called for: firstly, just because certain other people may do the same does not alter the moral unacceptability of the action: it simply means there are others just as reprehensible: no difference is made to the objection. Secondly, in this specific case there is a flaw: the parallel fails to be a parallel. The Old Testament contains many old laws and accounts of killings. To adduce it as evidence is fatuous: it does not form part of British law. The Koran, in complete contrast, is ALL part of Islamic Law, which specifies the death penalty for denying any verse (Manual of Islamic Law o8.7(7)). Every command in the Koran has legal status. Similarly, every speech and action by Mohammed, as recorded in the traditions accepted as reliable, has legal status.

“But Jewish society realises that it’s no longer acceptable to stone someone to death, or to cut out their eyes, or enslave them. And the vast majority of Muslims realise that too.”

This puts the Western reader at ease, but it is another of those we’ve-heard-them-all-before excuses, putting Islam on a par with Judaism. The vast majority of Muslims may have good qualities, but what they realise makes no difference to Islam. Islam is not defined by what the vast majority of Muslims realise. Its teachings are derived from the Koran and the traditions, the Hadith, of what Mohammed did and said. As it happens, stonings, eye-gouging, and enslavements, all of which Mohammed took part in or commanded, do, indeed, continue in the Islamic world. Although not normally reported by the mainstream media, they can be found on the internet. Sometimes, as with the schoolgirls in Nigeria, slave-taking receives some publicity.

Actually, in the reality of Islamic law, there IS a problem with Islam. As the article itself mentions, Muhammad said, “Whoever changes his religion kill him.” His word is Islamic law. As a result the one who has renounced Islam, the “apostate”, has to be killed. This is not something that muslims may opt to “believe” or not. That question does not arise in Islam, which has no freedom of religion. Muslims cannot choose: they are instructed. “It is not fitting for a Believer, man or woman, when a matter has been decided by Allah and His Messenger to have any option about their decision”, says Koran 33:36. Islamic Law indeed commands death for anyone who leaves Islam. “Leaving Islam is the ugliest form of unbelief (kufr) and the worst”, says the Manual of Islamic Law (o8.0): “When a person… voluntarily apostatizes from Islam he deserves to be killed” (o8.1).

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The Coronavirus is Allah’s Punishment Against the Kuffar

In the following video Muslim women in India are asked their opinion about the ChiCom virus. All of them are delighted that Allah has sent it to punish the infidels.

Also, they’re obviously unconcerned about social distancing, because they know they can only catch the coronavirus if Allah wills it.

Many thanks to Bose for the translation, and to Vlad Tepes for the subtitling:

Video transcript:

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Praying Muslims Defy the Coronavirus in Bangladesh

Nothing stops salat (Islamic prayer), not even the ChiCom virus. The following video shows more than 10,000 Muslims at prayer in Bangladesh. They know the coronavirus cannot harm them unless Allah wills it.

Many thanks to MissPiggy for the translation, and to Vlad Tepes for the subtitling:

Video transcript:

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The Chinese Virus in Thailand

Our Bangkok correspondent H. Numan sends this report on the impact that the Wuhan Coronavirus is having in Thailand.

The Chinese virus in Thailand

by H. Numan

Let’s call the beast by its real name, shall we? Incidentally, this is the second time China has infected the rest of the world. Without taking any responsibility for it. In 2002 we had the SARS virus going viral. In both cases it began in a fresh market. In both cases the Chinese government tried to look the other way for as long as possible. With the Coronavirus especially China does everything it can — that’s a lot! — to disassociate itself. Anyone (especially a man in a white house) who calls this virus by its true name is a racist. The measures China is taking are exactly what you can expect from a ruthless communist regime. Not to be admired, to say the least.

One of the first countries to enjoy the new Chinese export was Thailand. That was to be expected, with hindsight of course. About a third of the tourism industry relied (past tense!) on the Chinese market. That’s about twelve million arrivals. Once the virus really took hold the tourism industry effectively died. The one third of the market was forbidden to travel abroad. The remaining two thirds seriously reduced or changed travel plans. That means almost no arrivals at the airport. Empty hotels. Empty tourist attractions. Huge fleets of coaches standing idle. Tour leaders without work. We’re talking here about the livelihood of many millions of people.

Elephants are highly revered in Thailand, and no longer used for hard labor. Quite a lot of elephants are now kept in retirement camps, where they are taken care of and work with tourists. Usually by washing, feeding and interacting with the elephants. To a lesser extent rides on them. Only there are no tourists. An occasional Thai and a few farangs (=foreigners), but not enough to make ends meet. Elephants eat a lot. About 10% of their body weight daily. That’s roughly 360 kg of fodder every day, seven days per week. Many of those camps are in dire straits on how to keep the elephants alive. I have no idea what will happen. Will they be released into the wild? (That’s a horrible thought.) Will the government offer support? No idea.

Thailand is doing what it can to contain the virus. I happen to live in the center of Bangkok, in the diplomatic area (lucky me!). Central Chidlom is the most prestigious mall of Thailand. The guards at the door check everybody now for temperature. The bank next door also has a guard who sprays the doorknob every time a customer enters the bank. If you use the ATM, he cleans it. When I went to the immigration police, same story: everybody’s temperature was taken. From what I hear, roughly the same is done in the whole country.

Last week we had a bit of a stir when the minister of health, Khun Anutin Charnvirakul, tweeted that filthy western foreigners were the cause of the virus, as they never showered. It was because of them the ‘good Chinese tourists’ were now staying away. He had to apologize, which he sort of did. He hadn’t posted this on Twitter, but rather somebody else had. He was too busy to manage his Twitter account. In a Western government he would have had to pack his things immediately. All Western embassies did file complaints about his statement. But this is Thailand. Thus, his apology was accepted.

The country is in a nearly complete lockdown. Within the country you still can travel. There is no curfew. Yet. In many cities entertainment has been closed down completely. Some of it voluntary, some of it on orders of the local government. All borders are closed. New arrivals must show a health certificate not older than 3 days, and have valid health insurance covering at least $ 100,000. All large-scale activities have been postponed or canceled.

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“It’s Their Interpretation of Islam”

“It’s Their Interpretation of Islam”

by Michael Copeland

“Ah, but it’s their interpretation of Islam”, we are assured by smooth-talking muslim speakers. Journalists have picked this up, and dutifully write about “an extremist interpretation” that lies behind the latest atrocity. This assurance about interpretation is surprisingly successful. It is designed to make us doubt what Islam’s source texts mean, including — and this is the crafty part — those whose meaning is clear and obvious. We can easily be taken in by this appealing and fair-sounding assertion. It puts us off the scent. That is the idea.

First, it is necessary to clarify what is meant by an “interpretation”. If an instruction says “give away one tenth of your income to charity”, that does not require an interpretation. The meaning is quite clear, and the instruction can be exactly followed. An “interpretation” is different. Say a politician repeatedly evades an interviewer’s question with some bland generalisation. Eventually the interviewer says, “I’ll take that as a ‘No’”. That is an interpretation. It is quite a different matter from the straightforward following of what a text says.

Bearing in mind that the Koran — all of it — forms part of Islam’s law, how does the “interpretation” allegation stand up to the test?

Let us see. We can take commands and instructions from the Koran and Hadith and compare them with what muslim leaders and speakers say.

Hatred

Koran 60:4 praises the “excellent pattern” shown by Ibrahim when he said (to the Jews):

“Between us and you enmity and hatred forever….”.

How do the spokesmen treat that?

  • Osama bin Laden: “Enmity and hate shall forever reign between us.”
  • Osama bin Laden: “Battle, animosity, and hatred — from the Muslim to the infidel — is the foundation of our religion.”
  • islamqa.com: “Muslims in the West must have … enmity and hatred of the kaffirs.”
  • Alminbar.com: “You should hate them, disown them and their religion.”
  • Abu Usama, Birmingham: “No one loves the kuffaar. We hate kuffaar.”
  • Anjem Choudary: “As a muslim I must have hatred for everything non-Islam.”
  • Yousuf Makharzah, muslim cleric: “Animosity towards the Jews is an obligatory religious duty, and one of the signs of the believers.”

Killing

The Koran commands:

  • “Kill the non-muslims wherever you find them” 9:5
  • “Kill them wherever you overtake them, and expel them from wherever they have expelled you….” 2:191

What do the clerics say?

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The Peaceful, Tolerant Muslims of India

The two videos below provide snapshots of Islamic ideology in India. They are particularly apropos today, given the recent violent Muslim riots in Delhi, in which dozens of people were killed. (See these articles from Struggle for Hindu Existence for detailed information on events in Delhi: Article 1, Article 2, Article 3)

Many thanks to Janya for the translations, and to Vlad Tepes for the subtitling.

The first video shows the communal response planned for a man who “insulted Islam”:

The second video is a more generalized death threat against Hindu political leaders in India:

Video transcript #1:

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Being Progressive for Fun and Profit

For another St. Valentine’s Day treat, here’s an entertaining story (three stories, actually) from our Dutch correspondent H. Numan.

Being progressive for fun and profit

by H. Numan

Last week something funny happened. I’d like to share this chuckle with you. What happened? A bakery in the village of Monster in South Holland announced it had been harassed by extreme right-wing villagers. Consequently the baker closed his business, for safety reasons. Why was this baker harassed? He didn’t want to sell the highly racist ‘moorkoppen’ (Moorish heads) anymore. He had renamed them roomkoppen (cream puffs). Enraged villagers threatened him with violence. Hence he had to close his business. The media lapped it up as if were it moorkoppen. The same evening he was interviewed on TV. ‘Beware of extreme right-wing violence’ was the message. But not all is as it appears to be…

What’s a moorkop? Delicious, of course! It is a profiterole covered with chocolate. The name Moorish head isn’t centuries old, but quite old. According to Wikipedia it dates back to about 1920. Racist? Well, anything you want can be racist. Beauty Racism is in the eye of the beholder.

The media loved this act of racist Dutch violence. See? We were right all along. That sort of thing. So they didn’t do their homework. A progressive journalist doing fact-checking first? That’s for dummies. We bring you the real truth! Not all the media are progressive, so pretty soon the truth came out.

The baker was a vegan. Vegans are not necessarily extreme left-wing, missionary and obnoxious. Though I have yet to meet one that isn’t. This one was no exception. Being a vegan bakery is pretty much a political statement. He probably knows a lot about progressive politics, but not much about running a business. The poor harassed vegan baker was poor indeed, as he was near bankruptcy. He didn’t have any money for advertising. So he resorted to a clever trick. He renamed his moorkoppen as roomkoppen. Announced to the press he was harassed over his decision, and consequently closed his shop for safety reasons. That gave him a moment of prime time on national TV.

The journalists who did investigate quickly found out that only one or two (no more) customers told him they didn’t like his name change. That was all. Nothing more. On TV he wasn’t asked anything inquisitive at all; he was a poor oppressed victim of right-wing extremism. So they changed the one or two less satisfied customers in hordes of extreme right-wing activists.

What’s the end of the story? Well, nothing much, of course. The police now protect his bakery. They installed a video camera. The baker didn’t apologize for his blatant lie. Nor did the media. I doubt very much if he gained anything out of it. Monster is a tiny village. I lived nearby; it’s close to The Hague, within easy cycling distance. I’m not sure if the villagers like to be called extreme right-wing hooligans. Even if they frequent vegan bakeries. The Dutch FDA did forbid our progressive baker to call his moorkoppen roomkoppen, as they don’t contain any cream. That was all. On the very next day HEMA, a large store with lots of branches, announced they no longer will sell moorkoppen. From now on, they call them chocolate balls.

The HEMA is a large store that sells almost everything. Their strength is low price and fairly reasonable to decent quality. The abbreviation stands for Hollandse Eenheidsprijzen Maatschappij or Dutch single price company. If any company is Dutch, they are. And they are deeply ashamed of it. They want to be young, hip, and progressive. So their marketing department got to work on it. They launched a campaign in 2007-8, El HEMA, in which they went 100% mohammedan. Literally everything possible — up to being ridiculous — was changed into something promoting or resembling islam. For example, the Dutch love to give/eat letters made out of chocolate on Sinterklaas. So the HEMA added Arab letters to their collection. And made sure everything was clearly marked halal. Clothing was developed along this line with Arabic symbols, letters and much more.

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Islam’s Saints

This week’s edition of Dymphna’s greatest hits is from the spring of 2006. Until I reread the piece this morning, I had forgotten about the case of Abdul Rahman, the Afghan man who faced death for converting to Christianity, and who probably would have been executed had it not been for pressure brought to bear by the U.S. government.

The links embedded in the original no longer work, and have been removed.

Islam’s Saints

by Dymphna
originally published on March 28, 2006

The Christian convert in Afghanistan who faced execution has been let go, at least for the moment. Because Afghanistan’s President is anxious to join the modern world, which has a secular rule of law, he was able to bring pressure to bear on the Sharia Court to let the religious prisoner go. And because he wants to bring his country into the 21st century, Karzai was open to the urging of world leaders who called him to intervene in this case.

Things will not go so well for the Sharia-shackled prisoners in Iran. The government there is deaf to any pleading, and in fact, is planning its executions in secret so as to fly under the radar of humanitarian groups who might seek to interfere. Here are two current cases:

The first is a 17-year-old young woman named Nazanin who was out walking with her niece and their respective boyfriends in March, 2005. The two girls were set upon by three men. When the men began stoning the girls, the boys ran away. Injured from the stones, the girls were dragged to the ground and Act II, the rape, began. Nazanin managed to get out a knife she carried to protect herself from attacks. She stabbed her rapist in the chest and he died from the wound. So, of course, Nazanin now faces execution for this act of self-defense. She was sentenced in January, 2006, though the date of execution isn’t certain.

The second case is an older woman, Fatemeh Haghighat-Pajooh, who murdered her “temporary husband” for his attempted rape of her daughter. The whole sick idea of “temporary marriage” is Sharia-speak for permitting adultery and prostitution, which would otherwise be punishable by execution. “Temporary marriages” can be of any duration, from a quick assignation at lunch, to many years’ duration. You can be married to one woman and still contract with another for a muta. This is largely a Shi’ite permutation, though Sunnis have been known to use it when convenient. Needless to say, built in to this corruption is a lack of protection for the “wife” of these arrangements:

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