Name the Problem!

Last week I reported on the Italian television presenter Giuseppe Cruciani, who lambasted the Left on his program for its refusal to identify Islam as the ideology behind incidents of “honor violence” such as the murder of Saman Abbas.

Guido Reil is a member of the European Parliament for the AfD (Alternative für Deutschland, Alternative for Germany). In the following video clip from the floor of the EP, Mr. Reil emphasizes the importance of naming the source of slavery and violence in Bangladesh.

And what do you think that source might be? Any ideas?

Many thanks to Hellequin GB for the translation, and to Vlad Tepes and RAIR Foundation for the subtitling:

Video transcript:

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The Honor Killing of Saman Abbas

Earlier this month I posted about the presumed honor killing of a Pakistani girl in Italy by members of her extended family. The body of Saman Abbas has yet to be found, but her parents have decamped to Pakistan without her, and her little brother has told the authorities that she was killed for refusing an arranged marriage with a cousin.

Below is a video update on the case from Italian television. Many thanks to Gary Fouse for the translation, and to Vlad Tepes and RAIR Foundation for the subtitling:

The following article from Il Giornale (also translated by Gary Fouse) reports on Saman’s cousin Ikram Ijaz, who is now in police custody:

Saman’s cousin knows everything and remains silent: “I will talk in the future…”

In jail, Ikram Ijaz is not responding to GIP [Giudice di Indagine Preliminare, Preliminary Investigations Judge]: “Nothing to do with the end of my cousin”

by Nino Materi
June 12, 2021

After so many hours spent with his two lawyers to “fine-tune the defense strategy”, here is the result: “I avail myself of the right not to respond.” Ikram Ijaz, 28, a cousin of Saman Abbas, yesterday passed the translated sentence to the interpreter who relayed it to GIP and to the prosecutor who are investigating the disappearance of the 18-year-old Pakistani, killed by a family conspiracy and made to disappear who knows where. For about six weeks her body has been searched for in the fields around the agriculture business “Le Valli” in Novellara (Reggio-Emilia) where the Abbas family lived and where the young girl was seen for the last time April 29.

Yesterday was supposed to be the day of truth; it was, instead, the day of silence. The 28-year-old is accused of premeditated homicide (with others) and hiding a cadaver together with the uncle, Danish Hasnain (suspected of strangling Saman), along with another cousin, Nomanulhaq Nomanulhaq, and the parents of the victim: the father, Shabbar Abbas, and the mother, Nazia Shaheen. All four are fugitives. (The parents have fled to Pakistan, the other two are in flight in Europe.) Ikram Ijaz, the only one of those charged who is in jail, is one of the three who was captured by a security telecamera on April 30 as they walked away from the Abbas farmhouse carrying a shovel, crowbar, bucket, and plastic bags. The prosecutorial hypothesis is that the three (Ijaz, the other cousin, and the uncle) were going to bury the remains of Saman. A reconstruction of which Ijaz yesterday laconically distanced himself saying that he “had nothing to do with Saman’s disappearance”. But then what was he doing in that film? Why did he then flee to France? Two key questions that Ijaz would have been able to answer, dispelling any doubt about his involvement in a crime hatched by the same parents of Saman to punish their daughter, who was “guilty” of not having accepted an “arranged marriage” and of not comporting herself as a “good Muslim”. Instead, Ijaz — arrested on May 29 in France and extradited to Italy last week — when face-to-face with investigators in the Reggio Emilia jail did not respond to questions while pointing out that he was “willing to cooperate”. His lawyers note: “He has shown the intention of making more in-depth statements to the prosecutor in the coming days.” Then why not begin doing so immediately? The dilatory technique is a classic of the defense to understand what the prosecution has in hand: stalling is considered by defendants as an almost obligatory strategy. Still, in this case, the evidentiary picture is quite defined, and to crystallize it completely, only the discovery of the body of Saman is missing. (But that is not a small detail.).But this sentence, terrible, spoken by one of those charged — “We have done a good job” — is there to demonstrate how difficult it will be to recover the remains of the girl. Up until now, cadaver dogs and georadar have not obtained the hoped-for result. It is not excluded that the cadaver could have been dismembered into several parts and hidden in various places.

Meanwhile, the lawyers of the only charged person in jail (the parents of Saman have fled to Pakistan, while the uncle and the other cousin of the victim are fugitives in another country) maintain that their client “does not understand Italian well,” and therefore, for this reason, the time of “cooperation” risks “becoming longer”. The feeling instead is that Ijaz knows a lot — if not everything — about the sad fate of Saman. But that he has decided, at least for now, to keep his mouth shut. Perhaps out of fear of revenge. Perhaps because he wants “guarantees”. Or perhaps, more simply, because he has no conscience.

Another article from Il Giornale (also translated by Gary Fouse) discusses the reluctance of Italian politicians to mention JIM:

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To Vax or Not to Vax

According to the most recent estimate I read, about 40% of the American public has been “vaccinated” against COVID-19. My own personal experience is somewhat different — about 70% of my friends and family have taken the jab. To date, none of them has reported any significant adverse reactions, thank the Lord.

I don’t trust any government statistics about the negative effects of the experimental mRNA treatments that are commonly known as “vaccines”. Fed.gov (and its State.gov vassals) have been pushing the vax so hard, and spending so much money only glitzy advertising campaigns for it, that they’re hardly likely to come clean about any nasty sequelae. Besides, the government has been blatantly lying about so many things in recent years — why would anyone believe their stats?

That leaves us with anecdotal evidence, plus a patchwork of data gathered by researchers who receive no funding from governments or major institutions. The video below and the two articles following it provide some samples from that unofficial and anecdotal data.

Peter McCullough MD is a consultant cardiologist and Vice Chief of Medicine at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas, Texas. Below are some excerpts from a recent interview with him.

Many thanks to Vlad Tepes for uploading this video:

The following two articles were translated by Hellequin GB. The first is from the German-language service of RT:

Pharmaceutical entrepreneur does not want to be vaccinated against Corona: “Do not want to falsify my DNA”

For fear of a possible “falsification” of his DNA, the managing director of the largest Greek pharmaceutical company Vianex does not want to be vaccinated against Corona. He is not alone in this — both proponents and opponents of vaccination are enjoying a media controversy, while the Greek government has already introduced compulsory vaccination for the first professional groups.

Dimitris Giannakopoulos is from one of the best-known pharmaceutical companies in Greece. He is the managing director of the largest Greek pharmaceutical company, Vianex, which was founded by his father. Last week Giannakopoulos said in an Instagram post that he would not be vaccinated against COVID-19. As arguments he listed the extremely shortened development time of the vaccine and the resulting risks. For him, however, something else is decisive:

“A lot of people ask me if I’ve been vaccinated and with which vaccine. No, I haven’t gotten vaccinated and I won’t get vaccinated. Not because I’m afraid of the side effects, but because I don’t want to adulterate my DNA.”

According to the news magazine Telepolis, Giannakopoulos was referring to the mRNA vaccines. But he did not provide any further explanation.

Giannakopoulos’ company Vianex is one of the largest employers in Greece, with over 1,000 employees. According to Telepolis, the company maintains contacts with other pharmaceutical giants such as Merck & Co, Sanofi and Takeda, it exports medicines to over 35 countries, including Germany, and is recognized by the WHO as a pharmaceutical company.

In addition to Vianex, Giannakopoulos holds 50 percent of the shares in the nutritional supplement manufacturer Superfoods SA. This company sells food and alternative medicine preparations. Giannakopoulos is also the owner of the Panathinaikos AO basketball club.

There is a controversy going on in Greece about vaccinating or not vaccinating. For example, the former Vice Health Minister of the Syriza government, Pavlos Polakis, engaged in a public debate in the media with the pulmonologist and intensive care doctor Theodoros Vasilakopoulos. While Vasilakopoulos demanded extensive privileges for vaccinated people, Polakis came up with the argument that these were a punishment for the unvaccinated and for people who could not tolerate the vaccination.

According to Telepolis, fire and rescue workers were the first professional group in Greece to be vaccinated. The employees either have to be vaccinated or can receive their discharge papers.

A translated German-language article from Telegra.ph:

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Socialism: An Utter Lack of Empathy

Our Bangkok correspondent H. Numan compares situation of ladyboys in Thailand with that of transgenders in socialist Western countries.

Socialism: an utter lack of empathy

by H. Numan

Let’s start with two quotes from famous socialist politicians. The first one is German: “Du bist nichts. Dein Volk ist alles!” The second one is American: “Ask not what your country can do for you. Ask what you can do for your country!” We can start quibbling about the exact meaning of ‘Volk’. In this context it is identical. Though the first one is more in your face, and the second — probably a translation — more emphatic. The first socialist politician was Hitler. The other, John F. Kennedy. The essence of both quotes is absolute and total state control. That is socialism; national or international makes no difference.

I come more and more to the conclusion that true socialism is nothing but envy and an utter lack of empathy. Hidden under a surplus of empathy. The more people pretend to care about others, the less they do. Throughout the ages the very worst homophobes were gay themselves. Socialism is all about acquiring power and nothing else.

In this article I’d like to have a look at the perceived socialist empathy for transgenders. I’ve written about it in the past, but this is a topic you can’t hear often enough about. What is a transgender? Usually a guy who wants to be a woman. The reverse happens far less often. Transgenderism is an exclusively socialist fad in the West. There are no conservative transgenders. You see them exclusively in progressive circles. Being gay is something you can’t choose. But transgenderism is an acquired taste.

In Thailand (and some other Asian countries) the situation is somewhat different. Yes, it’s an acquired taste here as well. One isn’t born a transgender; one becomes a transgender. The difference is in the acceptance. Thai culture is vastly different (based on Buddhism, not on Christianity) from the West. There is far less guilt attached to sex in Buddhism. Doesn’t mean to say Thais boink everything in sight; far from it. Culturally, Thais are far more prudish than Westerners. Holding hands is something only youngsters do. Kissing in public is frowned upon. Every year the police raid short-time hotels on Valentine’s day, to catch teenagers doing naughty things. Compared to the west, Thailand is more like the ’50-’60’s: it’s there, we all do it, but discreetly. We don’t talk about it.

I have absolutely no idea why, but you see transgenders in Thailand everywhere. Some stunningly beautiful. Others, many of them, less so. They are almost as accepted as gays are. With regards to acceptance, no country is more tolerant towards gays and transgenders (we call them kathoeys) than Thailand. Strangely enough the Thai government is extremely conservative on gay rights. You can’t marry; you can’t legally live together as registered partners. Nothing. One is not persecuted. Everybody accepts it, except for academia and the government. They can be pretty homophobic at times.

Transgenderism is so common in Thailand that schools with larger numbers of transgenders create special bathrooms for them. In some universities they can wear girls’ uniforms. All Thai students, from kindergarten up to and including universities wear a uniform.

At first glance a paradise for kathoeys or ladyboys. Thai ladyboys are the luckiest on the world! The truth is very different. Something you won’t hear about from the left.

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Thailand, Land of the No More Smiles

Our Bangkok correspondent H. Numan sends a gloomy account of the situation in Thailand as the coronavirus “pandemic” winds down.

Thailand, land of the no more smiles

by H. Numan

I’ve got bad news and I’ve got bad news. Which do you want to hear first?

Let’s start with the bad news. Thai International Airlines is on the brink of declaring bankruptcy. The airline has been very badly managed, long before the Chinese Virus struck. Countless efforts have been made to revive the company. You can read as: every executive lined his pockets. Thursday the axeman will arrive. The government stated it will not support Thai Inter. The decision of the shareholders should have been reached last Friday, but they asked for an extension.

It’s a pretty big deal here. You can see that because… everybody pretends it is not a big deal! Loss of face, you know. If KLM goes belly up, the Dutch would be up in arms. Thais are the most chauvinistic people on the planet. Their national pride goes down, and it’s not really important? Come on!

Thai International is the national carrier. A long time ago, one of the very best airlines in the world. The food was excellent and the service superb. The problem was that they didn’t make any profits. Why? Well, everybody working in Thai Inter got free flights. And their family members. And friends. And the royal family (always first class, of course). And their staff. And the friends of the royal staff. And most government officials. And their friends. You get the idea, I think. That can work in a well-managed company in a strong economic climate. It doesn’t most of the time. Thai Inter was never well managed to begin with.

That was no problem when Thai Inter was a government-run airline. After privatization this continued and became a serious problem. One of many. They did cut costs, but that took much of the shine off the airline. The last time I flew Thai, it showed. Food was not too bad — but that comes from me. In other words: from a garbage can with very low gourmet standards. If I find food mediocre, people with higher standards, beware!!! Entertainment was dated. Chairs were visibly well used. Staff was still friendly, but clearly overworked.

It’s a very big deal for Thailand, as it is the national carrier. The reason of the postponement is to put more pressure on the government to cough up something. Which they won’t do. Currently, the offices on Vipawadee Rungsit Road are for sale. The company staff works in rented space. They were able to sell off their old Boeing 747’s. However, that is not enough. Thai bought a lot of big Airbuses 340 and 380 — which nobody wants. Those planes are brand new, and can only be sold for scrap value. That really hurts.

That was the bad news. Now for some more bad news. Thailand survived the Chinese Virus pandemic relatively unscathed. The first two waves, that is. Until third wave hit us, hard. The death toll rose from under a hundred for a whole year to 614 in a matter of weeks. It’s still pretty good, compared with other countries. Thailand ranks 117, whereas The Netherlands ranks 27, with +17,000 deaths. As Thailand has four times as many citizens and is a third-world country, that’s actually pretty good.

I live in the dark-red zone, being Bangkok. Dark-red is an euphemism for black… One of the reasons is the outbreak of the virus in Thai prisons. Especially in Bangkok and Chiang Mai. Thai prisons are notorious all over the world. One can, with good reason, call it Auschwitz in the tropics. Cells are vastly overcrowded: 40 men to a cell with barely room to move. Prisoners are kept in their cell from 3pm until 7am. With one jar for a toilet. No air-conditioning and all the mosquitoes you want. Thai cuisine is served: the cheapest rice possible with meat (cockroaches) or vegetarian (without the roaches). Water comes from a nearby canal. The guards differ from the ones in Auschwitz in that they don’t speak German. You won’t be surprised to hear that medical care and especially hygiene are matching. Hence, 6,853 cases in just the Bangkok prisons.

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The Nightmare of Hyperinflation is Coming

Our Bangkok correspondent H. Numan extrapolates from our present fiscal woes to something more grievous and possibly terminal.

The nightmare of hyperinflation is coming

by H. Numan

He who doesn’t learn from history is doomed to do it all over again. We haven’t learned a lot from history, and are going to make the same mistakes. However, history never repeats itself. It’s always different. One of the reasons is that people tend to look at history, and think: ‘I wouldn’t have done that. How stupid!’ That’s looking back with 20/20 hindsight. You know the problem, and know what didn’t work back then. Most people think our ancestors were really stupid and they themselves are very smart. No, they weren’t, and you aren’t.

We’re about to make the same mistakes all over again. The current dogma is that Hitler was extreme right-wing and the treaty of Versailles was too harsh. Both assumptions are wrong. Disastrously wrong, as you will find out.

Let’s start with Hitler. He didn’t come out of thin air. He became politically active in 1919. Hitler wasn’t extreme right-wing; he was a socialist. His ideas, many of them, were mainstream in Germany at the time. The Germany army started planning rearmament right after (probably before) signing the treaty of Versailles. All Hitler did, once he gained power, was to speed it up and drop any pretenses. All Germans into a greater Germany (‘Heim ins Reich’) was something every German wanted, left and right. The German army was already planning to conquer the east in the future. That’s why they didn’t have a problem with Hitler’s Lebensraum policy. At first together with Poland, only later they switched to conquering Poland first. Before attacking the USSR, that is. Either way, large swaths of Poland were originally German. They would have reconquered it anyway. With or without Hitler.

Hitler himself was a racist communist. Not my words. His own words. He wrote in Mein Kampf, pages 406-407, that National Socialism differs from Communism only in its racism. Take away racial ideology from Nazism, and you’ve got communism.

Now the treaty of Versailles. World War One ended in three treaties: Versailles (Germany), Trianon (Austria-Hungary) and Lausanne (Ottoman empire). The treaties of Trianon and Lausanne were really harsh. They literally drew and quartered those empires into little pieces. Versailles was as lenient as it could be. Germany lost some territory, had to pay a steep penalty and was restricted in her armed forces. Compared with the other treaties almost a slap on the wrist. Don’t forget the Allies made huge sacrifices. Settling for anything less was not possible; their electorates would never have accepted that.

On the other hand — something not only the Germans tend to overlook — we have the treaty of Brest-Litovsk (March 3, 1918), which ended the war on the Eastern Front in favor of Germany. That was a real diktat. It was harsh to the max, so harsh that the USSR didn’t want to sign it. Kein Problem, said the German army. Then we simply go on. So they did, and added more demands. The USSR understood they had two options: take it or leave it. They took it. If you are merciless yourself, you can’t ask for mercy.

What you probably don’t know is that Germany, long before the war began, had the most developed welfare state of the time. Not only that, the German parliament was predominantly left-wing, with very strong labor and communist parties. They didn’t have any influence, mind you. Bismarck started with social laws, so they couldn’t. Not because Bismarck was a socialist, far from it. Better to give a little now instead of being forced to give more later on was his policy.

The German plan was to saddle the Allies with massive demands and make them pay for the war, plus a little extra. The problem was they lost that war. Experts have calculated they couldn’t make any profit out of the war. The costs were simply too high. Just like the Allies in the Versailles treaty, they would have to settle for something more realistic. However, that is moot. They lost. The result was a very expensive welfare state and massive war debts.

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Why Does Thailand Have Such a Low Incidence of COVID-19 Deaths?

In the following video a doctor who specializes in infectious diseases for a major group of hospitals in Thailand explains why the country has so few deaths from the Wuhan Coronavirus compared with most other countries.

Many thanks to Hellequin GB for the translation, and to Vlad Tepes and RAIR Foundation for the subtitling:

Video transcript:

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Islam: Western Leaders Are Well Deceived

Islam: Western Leaders Are Well Deceived

by Michael Copeland

Islam has a sinister feature that is insufficiently known in the West: authorised deception. This has an Arabic name, taqiyya, and features as “Permissible Lying” in the Manual of Islamic Law, Reliance of the Traveller, r8. The Muslim Brotherhood’s secret Explanatory Memorandum, captured in a police raid, instructs on “Using deception to mask intended goals”. “Taqiyya permeates almost all the activities and dealings of Muslims with non-Muslim societies…”, explains Sam Solomon, former professor of Sharia law. After all, one of Allah’s ninety-nine names is “The Greatest of Deceivers”.

“If you want to know about Islam”, writes Paul Wilkinson, “Do not talk to Muslims”. You are likely to be given a misleading account. British Prime Ministers Blair and Cameron were both advised by the smooth-talking serial liar Tariq Ramadan. He is the likely source of their bold confident statements on Islam, which, though made with a great air of authority, are hopelessly erroneous. The West’s politicians, of course, as Pat Condell observes, are all Islamic scholars: “They are, aren’t they?”

“After every atrocity committed in the name of Islam,” said Geert Wilders, “Barack Obama, David Cameron, Angela Merkel and my own Prime Minister [Rutte] rush to the television cameras to declare that these acts have nothing to do with Islam.

“How stupid do they think we are?”

Jamie Glazov, in Jihadist Psychopath, writes, “Some kind of “pressure” is in the air — a pressure that ensures that after every jihadist attack, we call the attack everything but what it actually is. We are to ascribe many different motives to the perpetrators, except the very motives that they themselves have candidly identified.”

A commenter, CogitoErgoSum, observes, “Seems to me that… all of the leaders in the West are practicing wishful thinking. These people are hoping that if they repeat something often enough it will become accepted by the masses.”

David Wood complains, “The only response… is to say, over and over again, that real Islam promotes peace and tolerance… Hence, what British leaders are doing is actually worse than doing nothing. They are actively protecting and promoting the ideology that calls for the violence.”

The Litany of Denial

Western politicians, and judges too, show how well deceived they are when they make authoritative pronouncements denying any link between Islamic State and Islam, likewise when they confidently repeat that terrorists have distorted Islam. Both are successful products of taqiyya deception.

“…there is… nothing whatsoever about ISIL that is related to Islam.” — John Kerry, US Secretary of State, 12 Oct 2014

“I refuse to call them the Islamic State, because they are neither Islamic or a state.” — Hillary Clinton

“They have nothing to do with the great religion of Islam” — David Cameron

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Sanction the Axis of Mercenary and Terrorist Evil

Here’s the latest from David Boyajian on the conflict between Azerbaijan and Armenia over Artsakh.


Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and Azerbaijani President Ilham Aliyev — Credit: Asbarez.com

Sanction the Axis of Mercenary and Terrorist Evil: Azerbaijan, Turkey, and Georgia

by David Boyajian

Azerbaijan deployed thousands of mercenaries in last year’s 44-day war that it and Turkey waged against Artsakh/Nagorno-Karabagh and Armenia.

Azerbaijan thereby flagrantly violated the UN’s International Convention against the Recruitment, Use, Financing and Training of Mercenaries (UNMERC) which it signed in 1997.

Forty-six countries have signed UNMERC, including Belgium, Cyprus, Germany, Italy, New Zealand, and Poland.

These mercenaries are not clean-cut military men. They’re terrorists, thugs, jihadis, and fanatics.

The Evidence

They include former ISIS commander Sayf Balud, and members of the Hamza Division, Sultan Murad Brigade, Al-Amshat Militia, Free Syrian Army (FSA/SNA), and other factions.

Many were brought into Azerbaijan before the war began on September 27, 2020. Unknown numbers remain there despite the November 9 armistice.

Armenian forces captured two mercenaries who came from Syria’s Hama and Idlib provinces.

The independent UK-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights has confirmed Azerbaijan’s employing mercenaries. In October, it numbered them at over 2,050 with 145 dead.

Columbia University’s Institute for the Study of Human Rights has named the chief mercenary commanders, such as Fehim Isa of the Sultan Murad Brigade, and their organizations.

Video and audio recordings have identified many of the mercenaries.

Azeri soldiers have forced some of them into battle at gunpoint and lied about the combat conditions. “Haji… don’t come,” warned one mercenary. “We have been deceived… this is a meat grinder.”

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You Have Been Couped

Our Bangkok correspondent H. Numan takes a look at the current political débâcle in the USA from the perspective of someone with plenty of experience in military coups.

You have been couped

by H. Numan

Folks, I have lived exactly 25 years in Thailand. In those years I witnessed three coups, and at least four coup attempts. During the six week siege of the center of Bangkok in 2009 I stayed well within the besieged area, at home. Pretty lonely. Only my partner, two security guards and I were there. Everybody else in the building had left for safer places. Even the receptionists. Just before the siege began I saw the evacuation of Asean leaders in the Royal Cliff Resort by helicopters. At that moment I was in the house of a friend, on the other side of the Bay of Pattaya. I was just able to leave on the last bus going back to Bangkok. Literally on the wings of the revolution. The bus drove in a caravan of taxis loaded with Thaksin supporters, also on the way to Bangkok. I won’t say I’m an expert in coups and revolutions, but I do have a lot more experience with them than most people.

What happened in America was a coup. Welcome in the new Democratic Republic of the United States of America!

We know for 100% certain the elections were rigged. The problem is how to prove it. Bigger problem: how to get judges deliver an unbiased verdict. Most judges prefer to stay out of political turmoil. Just look at the OJ Simpson case. His lawyer very cleverly played the race card. It gave him a get out of jail free card. Was he guilty? Of course. But the court preferred to rule on the safe side in a politicized trial. Just as is happening now.

America doesn’t have egg on his face; it’s far worse than that. Uncle Sam is completely covered in manure. The leader of the free world, apostle of free and fair elections worldwide, can’t hold free and fair elections itself! I’m beginning to believe the bible actually is true: the dead perhaps didn’t walk the streets of Jerusalem (Matthew 27:50-54). They surely walked the streets of Georgia and Arizona in order to vote for Biden. The dead even rose twice in Georgia. After voting for Biden, they returned to quickly vote in two ‘Democrat’ senators. The devil came down to Georgia, looking for some votes to steal.

The icing on the coup — it definitely was one — is the coup de grâce administered by Republican senators. Had they held firm, Trump wouldn’t have to leave his office disgraced. Better learn to live with it, because the slaveholders finally won. Never forget the Democrat party was and is the party supporting slavery. It was and is the party of the Ku Klux Klan. It was and is the party of Antifa. It took 150 years, but finally the South rose again!

What you experienced was a soft coup. Why do you think Biden hid in his basement? He knew he didn’t have to campaign to win. That means the whole election was rigged long before covid came along. That was just a handy excuse. Forget any notion of ‘Biden got the idea of using the covid pandemic for his own benefit‘. This kind of fraud requires a lot of planning and organization. Supposing there was no covid pandemic, he would have stolen the election anyway.

For you who don’t know much about coups, some information:

  • You don’t need a professional army to commit one. A drafted army will do very nicely, as any Thai general can confirm. All it requires is iron discipline. Every year several drafted Thai soldiers die due to extreme physical abuse. Believe me: it’s no fun being a Thai private.
  • You don’t need massive popular support, or any at all. In Thailand support comes from the elite, the army itself and you-know-who. Actually, the 2006 coup was the first in Thai history where the people supported the generals. In America support comes from the extreme left, the media, civil servants and big tech. Not from the general population.
  • You don’t need a large group to commit the coup. Most coups are like a mugging, but on a larger scale. A hit with a baseball bat on the head. Knock your opponent out before he can react. That’s why most coups always take place at night or very early in the morning. Very fast, with a massive show of force, occupying the communication centers, the seat of government and transportation centers (railway stations, airports). You don’t need a lot of people to do that. The US coup is a soft coup, which works differently.
  • A soft coup is letting someone else do your dirty work for you. In Thailand we have those infamous lèse-majesté laws. When Thaksin was prime minister, he used those laws for his own benefit. Any critic of his governance was criticizing the king, as he was the direct representative of the king. So, a lot of people were dragged in court and convicted. He didn’t even have to lift a finger. All he had to do was instruct the police on what to do. The juridical apparatus does everything else. That is what is happening right now in America.
  • The army, the police and civil servants always support the current government, no matter who that might be. Some individuals may not do that, but the institutions do. We Dutch have a lot of experience with that. The army not so much; that was taken into captivity. However, our police and civil servants more than made up for it. We didn’t have a large Quisling movement (NSB, Nationaal Socialistische Beweging) in the country. Our quislings were civil servants and the police. As you are about to discover very soon yourself…
     
    Oh, before I forget. Once the problems are over, they are rarely prosecuted. As they were humble public servants, just doing their duty. It took 25 years before the Dutch police had cleaned itself and got rid of their NSB image. Nearly all NSBers were prosecuted and sentenced to lengthy jail terms. Very few Dutch policemen were prosecuted.
  • It’s very important to give the enemy a way to escape. No enemy is more dangerous than a cornered enemy. Always, always, always give him an escape route. Otherwise, he has nothing to lose and fights until his death. Not a problem, but that could possibly incur your death. Even better, a fleeing enemy is the best target there is. Most victims don’t fall in battle, but after the battle is over and turned into a rout. Your escape route is: better luck next time. Only there is no next time. No more Republicans will be elected president. From now on, every American president will be a International Socialist Democrat.

So what will happen? At first, not a lot. Biden will mumble the oath of office. He’s turning senile, but that he can manage. Even if he can’t, that’s what you have a vice president for. From that moment onward, the president will be Kamala Harris. She will rule — with an iron rod. She has to.

Forget Hunter Biden’s laptop. Biden won’t be impeached. There is now a majority in both Congress and the Senate. Congress won’t impeach, the Senate will not support an impeachment. The FBI will investigate the matter ‘thoroughly’. That will take probably many years. The media will not report about this case at all. It must be forgotten. As quickly as possible.

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Assembly With Menaces

The article below by Michael Copeland was originally published at Liberty GB in February, 2015. It refers to demonstrations after the Charlie Hebdo attacks in Paris, the fifth anniversary of which is coming up on January 7.

Assembly With Menaces

by Michael Copeland

A large number of Muslims gathered outside the gates of Downing Street on Sunday February 8, 2015, in a gender-segregated “show of strength”, blocking half of Whitehall for rather too long — some three hours. This was a month after the mass murder by Muslims in Paris of the Charlie Hebdo cartoonists and of the Jews in the Kosher Hypermarket, and not long after the release of the film of the deliberate burning alive by the Islamic State of a Jordanian pilot, confined in a cage.

Had they come to express sympathy for the victims? Condolences for the next of kin? Solidarity with free speech? Disgust at the barbaric burning? No. Remember, like all similar Muslim events, this event was not in the least spontaneous: this was “organised”, that is, instructed, in the mosques, and at the behest of the Muslim Action Forum. They had come to make an assembly with menaces.

The Muslim Action Forum is lying

The Muslim Action Forum made an announcement, but they were lying. Lying, however, is not only permitted under Islamic law when it is done to non-Muslims in the cause of Islam, it is in some circumstances obligatory. It has an Arabic name: taqiyya. The Muslim Action Forum makes claims that are supposed to be so sweet and reasonable. They are nothing of the sort.

Incitement, hatred and provocation

“We need to move from actions of incitement, hatred and provocation”, say the Muslim Action Forum. Oh yes? Who are “we”? Muslims? How can that be? Islam’s own texts repeatedly include incitement, instruct hatred and commend it, and express provocation.

Incitement


“Kill unbelievers wherever you find them,” incites verse 5 of Koran chapter — “sura” — 9, the Sura At Tawba. This is the one cited by the killer of Lee Rigby. It overrides and “abrogates” all the verses of peace and forgiveness elsewhere in the Koran, because it is later in time sequence. This is the effect of Islam’s doctrine of Abrogation. The doctrine, like the Koran, is part of Islamic Law. The teachings of the Koran are “true, …universal and trans-time,” explains Ahmed Saad, of North London Central Mosque. That verse is straightforward and legally binding incitement.

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Why So Many Coups?

In the midst of our great election crisis, here’s the latest news on another crisis — the one in Thailand, as reported by our Bangkok correspondent H. Numan.

Why so many coups?

by H. Numan

I’ve been reporting about Thailand for many years. This year, on the 30th of December, I celebrate 25 years of being an alien. I kind of dislike being called an alien, but there you go. That is what foreigners are called under Thai law. Thailand is not America. You can’t get a green card. Citizenship is possible, but… his majesty the king personally grants you citizenship. As kings usually have more important things to do, you can understand that acquiring Thai nationality is pretty difficult. In those 25 years I witnessed and reported about three successful coups, several failed coup attempts, a siege of Bangkok and more. When I arrived in 1994 the 24th constitution was being written. I’ve lost count, but the current one should be version 26 or 27.

We expats joke about so many constitutions: The new constitution™. Super clean! Now with more Anti-Corruptors© and extra transparency! I calculated how often a coup has been committed since the bloodless coup of 1932 that abolished the absolute monarchy. Should be around 40. On average a coup every four years. One could say, with good reason, the form of Thai government is a coup-o-cracy. We go to the ballot box every four years; Thais have a coup. Why is that?

One big reason is the capital. Bangkok is twenty-six times bigger than the next largest city. It’s quite common for capitals to be bigger than other cities in a country, but 26 times bigger is unique. The Bangkok Metropolitan Area (BMA) is the city of Bangkok with surrounding provinces as an administrative unit. It is the only multi-province city in the country, and that has vast consequences. Effectively Bangkok is a huge city-state with Thailand surrounding it. For Dutch readers: the size of the BMA is equal to the province of Gelderland, the largest Dutch province. With as many inhabitants as The Netherlands has. Imagine everybody living in Gelderland and nowhere else. Makes for a pretty big city, what?

All roads in Thailand lead to Bangkok. Literally and metaphorically. Most companies have their headquarters in Bangkok. If they haven’t, they are not a nationwide or international company. Same goes for education. Of course you can study somewhere else, but most — and the most prestigious — universities are in Bangkok. A civil career means finding a job in administration — which you find in Bangkok. Bangkokians talk about ‘up country’ which means anywhere outside of Bangkok. The legal minimum wage varies per province, but is highest in Bangkok, where the cost of living is the highest. Roughly speaking, about 20 million people live in Bangkok. The remaining +50 million live ‘up country’. Thais have a saying: the government is elected up country, but sent home in Bangkok.

When I arrived in 1994, Thailand had gone through a bloody coup period. Democracy was new, and thriving. Thaksin Shinawatra was a business tycoon who just went into politics. I was there on a meeting when he, as the new minister for telecommunications, announced he would solve the traffic problems of Bangkok in three months. Of course he couldn’t. I think even the mighty Heracles would prefer cleaning the stable of King Augeas rather than solve that problem. Much easier!

That period was the eye in the storm. A temporary calm period. Thaksin was a very capable politician. His traffic promise cost his party, the Palang Dharma party, everything. They disappeared. He walked away scot-free and founded a new party. He used his own marketing team to do the promotion. That’s like Mark Zuckerberg deciding he wants to become PM, and ordering his marketing team to make it happen. Of course, it happened.

Adherents of Thaksin wore red shirts. The color has nothing to do with communism. The communist party is explicitly forbidden in every Thai constitution. Red stands for the blood of the people or for the people itself. It’s a very common mistake made by left-wing intellectuals: Thaksin supporters are predominantly rural and urban poor, and wear red. So they must fight for the proletariat! Don’t laugh. They really think that. I had the experience during the Siege of Bangkok.

Which brings us to Thai nobility. We have our own nobility. They don’t have western titles, like duke or count. But they do have titles, and are hugely powerful. The system is very different from the West. Every generation inherits a lower ranking title, up to three generations. After that they are no longer noble. Though most often still recognizable: when someone has ‘na’ in the family name, they decent from nobility, like ‘von’ in German. “Somchai Na Ayutthaya” would be someone descending from the royal family of Ayutthaya. We expats often joke about that. Patpong is both the name of the famous red light district of Bangkok and a very rich and extremely powerful family. Jimmy Na Patpong would be a joke name for someone visiting the nightlife very often. Na Patpong, by the way, does not exist. The Patpong family is not noble, though they own that plot of Bangkok.

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Book Reviews II: The Koran

A year ago Michael Copeland posted his first selection of reviews of the Koran. Below is his second selection.

Book Reviews II: The Koran

Compiled by Michael Copeland

  • “…this indigestible book, whose every page makes healthy human reason quiver.” — Voltaire (1694-1778)
  • “This book is a long conference of God, the angels, and Mahomet, which that false prophet very grossly invented…” — George Sale, Introduction to “The Koran, commonly called the Alcoran of Mohammed”, 1784, belonging to Thomas Jefferson.
  • “The precept of the Koran is, perpetual war against all who deny, that Mahomet is the prophet of God.” — John Quincy Adams (1767-1848), 6th President of the United States
  • “…incites violence, disturbs public tranquillity, promotes, on grounds of religion, feelings of enmity, hatred, and ill-will between different religious communities…” — The Writ Application in The High Court at Calcutta
  • “The Koran is not the solution to Islamic radicalism, it is the cause.”Daniel Greenfield
  • “To tell you the truth, I didn’t find anything I liked.”Ashin Wirathu, Buddhist monk activist, Myanmar
  • “…a confusing and tedious book that most people don’t enjoy.”Ali Sina, ex-Muslim
  • “It offers nothing but ignorance.”Apostate Prophet
  • “a unified message of triumphalism, otherworldliness, and religious hatred” — Sam Harris
  • “a clearly-written, us-versus-them hate-crime book, endorsing a permanent might-makes-right death-threat.” — Uncle Vladdi, comment
  • “a pretty tedious screed of exhortations to violence against unbelievers interspersed with an occasional thought on the Last Judgment.” — Kepha, comment
  • “It’s horrendous. Shocking. Disgusting.” — OP, comment
  • “…the worst major religious work of all time, … exceedingly repetitive, stupid, boring, nauseating and disgusting ….” — Wellington, comment Jan 31, 2020 at 6:16 pm

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A Tale of Two Kings

In his latest report H. Numan gets to wear both his hats at the same time: The “Dutch correspondent” one, and the “Bangkok correspondent” one.

A tale of two kings

by H. Numan

It doesn’t happen often, but I can report about The Netherlands and Thailand at the same time. Both kings have the same problems. The difference is that one of them has a lot more of those problems on his plate.

King Willem-Alexander decided to spent an autumn holiday in his mansion in Greece. Almost immediately after he announced in the troonrede (our State of the Union) the government gave him a raise of 8%. His subjects also got a steep raise, albeit in taxation. Someone has to pay for it all, and it ain’t king Billy. Just before that State of the Union the king insisted his daughter Amalia will become a millionaire on her eighteenth birthday. Then she has to set up her own private cabinet as crown princess, to the tune of €1.8 million per year. That is considered by just about everybody in the country as somewhat steep for an eighteen-year-old girl. Before this, the king bought a very nice speedboat for only two million euros.

Now, each affair could easily be managed on its own. But gaffe after gaffe after gaffe is too much. The population began to grumble when the press announced the king was taking it easy in his mansion in Greece. Especially with all restrictions and travel bans for everyone else. The grumbling — it’s only grumbling, but we Dutch sure can grumble! — became so strong the government had to order the king back home, pronto.

Back home he made a full insincere apology on national TV, on all channels. I stress insincere. Why? Because he and his wife returned home, but his daughters stayed partying in Greece. The reason? The airline was fully booked. I kid you not. KLM Royal Dutch Airlines was… fully booked.

That’s the very same airline that is forced to let the king fly Boeings whenever he feels like it. No joke: King Billy does have a commercial pilot’s license, and “asked” KLM if he could fly once in a while. Of course you can, your majesty, replied KLM. So it’s possible the captain of your plane might be the king himself. Which you probably won’t know, as he flies incognito. “Good morning, ladies and gentlemen. I am your captain, Willem-Alexander of Orange, by the grace of God king of the Netherlands, prince of Orange, count of Nassau, etc. etc. etc.” is something you won’t hear. Listen to his name though. If the captain is Willem or Wim van Buuren, it’s him. The Orange family uses that incognito a lot.

Can you imagine any airline refusing to fly a royal family, because the flight was fully booked? Especially now, during a pandemic with severe travel restrictions? And almost nobody flying? Well, about 15 million Dutch do. Because they swallowed that silly excuse as if it were speculaas (Dutch spiced cookies). Let’s tally that as one of his many gaffes. King Willem is not only king of The Netherlands, but surely king of gaffes. I can fill a book with them by now.

Over on the other side of the globe. To not-so-warm (24° C/76° F) and sunny Thailand. The cool season has started; it’s pretty chilly early in the morning.

To my surprise that televised excuse of King Willem went completely viral in Thailand. Thais are amazed. “Look at that king! Wish he was ours!” “Wow. Is that really possible????” That’s on the not-yellow brick road; the demonstrators. On the yellow brick road, royalists are outraged by it. “The king has to offer his apologies? Why on earth? Why doesn’t he throw them all in jail?”

As I wrote earlier, for the first time in history the Thai students are (somewhat) rising against the monarchy. A small protest that became nationwide. At first the demand was some restriction on the severe lèse majesté laws, and more transparent government. After that the protests grew really big; they now demand the government resign.

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