Quebec Copes With the ChiCom Flu

For the last few weeks, as I drive around adjacent areas of the Virginia Piedmont, I’ve been keeping an eye out for state police checkpoints set up to monitor compliance with the ChiCom flu travel restrictions. I haven’t seen any so far, and I don’t really expect any this far out in the boonies. Maybe there will be some eventually in the larger cities, but the largest city I regularly venture into is Charlottesville.

All the checkpoints I’ve read about are between states. The Rhode Island blockade of New Yorkers has been getting the most press coverage, and there were also reports that Florida state police have been stopping New York cars at the Georgia state line. If those New York refugees are smart, they’ll stop off in Augusta or somewhere and rent a car so they can slip into Florida with a set of Georgia plates.

Meanwhile in Canada, the province of Quebec has the most stringent controls I’ve heard of to date. Not only are the authorities stopping all traffic crossing the bridges from Ontario, but they’ve also set up internal checkpoints to keep people from traveling from one region to another.

Many thanks to Vlad Tepes for recording and uploading this video:

Here’s a CBC report on the situation in Quebec:

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Austria: The Coronavirus Chronicles

The essay below by Elisabeth Sabaditsch-Wolff was originally published by the Gatestone Institute in a slightly different form.

Austria: The Coronavirus Chronicles

by Elisabeth Sabaditsch-Wolff

Week 1 in a country in complete shutdown.

Austria has been at the forefront in forcing its citizens to “shelter in place” by enacting measures so draconian that even the country’s elderly, having survived World War II, cannot remember anything similar. In order to snuff out a virus that originated in China only a few months ago and has since made its way around the world thanks to globalism, countless other countries have followed Austria’s lead. Only a week ago — it seems like eons ago! — the Austrian government, led by Chancellor Sebastian Kurz who heeded a dire warning by acting Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu, apparently deeply concerned about the critical situation (its reasons expertly explained by Guy Miliere) in its neighboring country Italy, enacted a first set of measures, followed by the previously-mentioned drastic rules. Austria’s confinement measures were recently extended until April 13.

Countries in Europe and around the world are reacting to threat of the Covid-19 in different ways. Soeren Kern has done an excellent survey here; a collection of reports from local journalists on how they are experiencing the lockdown across Europe may be found here.

And yet there are other noteworthy findings:

  • Climate change, Greta Thunberg, Fridays for Future are now mostly irrelevant. Health measures clearly take precedence over kids cutting school. Nevertheless, the political Left has always been adept at never letting a crisis go to waste and using it to do things that couldn’t be done before (Rahm Emanuel). One case in point is the Austrian minister of health, a radical member of the Greens party, who is on the record for saying (threatening?): “I am looking forward to the day we have successfully weathered the Corona crisis and when we tackle the climate crisis with similar political consequence.”
  • Borders matter! Europeans and Americans concerned about porous borders have been vindicated as borders on both sides of the Atlantic are closed. In addition to the imminent collapse of the Schengen open-borders system, which beginning in 1995 put an end to bothersome passport controls in an area of 26 European countries. And President Trump announced that, “We will be, by mutual consent, temporarily closing our Northern Border with Canada to non-essential traffic.”
  • Sovereignty and nationalism matter. Karen Siegemund, president of the American Freedom Alliance, notes:
        Notice how each country — country! — took upon itself its right to sovereign action to protect its citizens.

    Italy imposed quarantines; Austria closed its borders and implemented various restrictions on gatherings and mandated closures of entertainment venues, restaurants etc. Even Germany has now closed its borders.

    Borders in the context of Europe is an astounding thing, and it’s heartbreaking that it took a virus, and the deaths it’s left in its wake, rather than the years-long invasions for them to assert sovereignty, and to finally, finally, turn to protecting their citizens.
     

  • “Europe” in the form of the European Union has been silent. The United Nations doesn’t even seem to be speaking out although, in a rational world they’d be calling for “Crimes against humanity” charges to be brought against China; further proof of the UN’s uselessness at best, and of the EU’s utter irrelevance.

    It’s nations putting the health, safety and security of their people above all else that will stem the spread of this virus; it’s a nightmare that it took this pandemic to wake governments up to the primacy of their people as the core of their responsibility.

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A Surprise Change of Venue for the Democratic National Convention

The Democrats have abruptly decided to relocate this summer’s nominating convention. Here’s the story from The Washington Post:

In a surprise move, the Democratic National Committee has decided to relocate the party’s July convention to Wuhan, China.

The convention was scheduled to take place during the week of July 13th in Milwaukee. However, with the coronavirus pandemic raging through major American cities, it had become unclear whether an event of that size would be allowed to take place.

At a hastily-convened press conference in Washington D.C., DNC Chairman Tom Perez said, “Since the very beginning of the coronavirus crisis, the Democratic Party has admired the way China has handled the infection. Chinese officials acted promptly and decisively back in January, implementing stringent measures that curbed the spread of the disease. As a result, no new coronavirus cases have been reported in China for several weeks. With respect to the coronavirus, Wuhan is now the safest city to be in on the planet.

“It had become uncertain whether we would be able to hold the convention in Milwaukee in July, given the way the disease is trending. The Chinese government has made an excellent facility available to host the relocated convention. It’s a large building in Wuhan that was formerly used to manufacture funeral urns, for which purpose it is of course no longer needed.

“There will be plenty of time to refit the premises for the full participation of the international media, so you will be well taken care of there. All American journalists can expect the usual gracious Chinese hospitality — except for those malcontents who were recently expelled from the country, naturally, but that’s only a tiny minority.”

Lijian Zhao, an official spokesperson for the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs, confirmed his government’s offer. He said further details of the arrangements will be announced in the coming weeks.

Covid in a Time of Turmoil, Part One

The following essay by Seneca III is the first of two installments on the political fortunes of Prime Minister BoJo during the coronavirus crisis in the UK.

Covid in a Time of Turmoil

by Seneca III

Part I — BoJo, dithering, the Classics and the people.

Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson, Hon FRIBA, is, as we all are, a product of his time and place, and in his case a time and place of wealth and privilege. This, however, is not necessarily a detrimental factor in the genesis of a British Prime Minister; Churchill was very much of the same mould and class, and when the time came to step up to the plate he did so despite his prior mistakes. Many of Churchill’s predecessors in political office and down his family line did the same. On the family side Marlborough was a prime example, and Winston’s model and hero.

On Johnson’s family side I can find nothing of note on the political front, so one has to look back to those two political and mutually antagonistic giants of the political scene during the Victorian Era — Gladstone and Disraeli (Churchill was born during the late lifetime of both of them, which may well have left some impressions on him during his early education.)

Gladstone was a Liberal, and Disraeli a Conservative Social Reformer who brought in ‘The Public Health Act of 1875’ creating a public health authority in every area. They were in essence two sides of the same coin who spent their lives back to back without ever joining in common cause.

Many of Johnson’s compatriots at Oxford and in the Bullingdon Club were reading PPE (Politics, Philosophy & Economics) so it is unlikely that Gladstone and Disraeli to were totally unknown to him. Furthermore, David Cameron was also educated at Eton and at Brasenose College, Oxford, as was George Osborne at Magdalen College, Oxford, where he read Modern History. All of them were political animals and debaters, and Johnson was deep in with this ‘in group’.

Consequently, I can’t help thinking that Boris may be a confused amalgam of both Gladstone and Disraeli, a muddle of their inclinations and character traits. As a result his known social reformation instincts are so often at odds with his wishy-washy Liberalism that they result in his dithering and prolonged periods of indecision before taking definitive action, particularly when faced with an unforeseen dilemma of the epic proportions that is his lot today.

Nevertheless, it must have been obvious to him that John Major, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown, David Cameron and Theresa May had left one almighty mess to be sorted out even prior to Covid, but he chose to take on the job anyway, possibly consumed by hubris. Indeed he fought hard for it, so it is worth having a further look at his public persona and presentation and his consummate, driving ambition in order to determine whether we can find any indicators as to why at first he reacted to this his first real challenge in the way that he did… slowly, with trepidation hidden beneath layers of homely bravura, bonhomie and buck-passing to medical scientists, at least one of whom is known to have been seriously flawed in his previous analyses and consequent recommendations, particularly in the case of the BSE epidemic.

Johnson was born in New York City to upper-middle-class English parents and educated at Eton College. He read Classics at Balliol College, Oxford, where he was elected President of the Oxford Union in 1986. There, as previously mentioned, he was also a member of the infamous Bullingdon Club alongside a young Cameron and the later Chancellor Osborne, the former who preceded him into Downing Street prior to Treason May.

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Cashing in on the ChiCom Flu

Instead of commercial email services, I maintain my own mail server and use it for most of my email accounts. As a result, I have to deal with a lot of spam — I don’t get the low-spam benefits that Gmail or Yahoo customers enjoy.

For years spammers have been taking advantage of not-so-bright preppers. At least that’s what it seems like, based on the amount of “tactical” this-and-that spam I have to deal with. But for the last month or so the coronavirus-related scams have been appearing more and more in the flow of spam. Face masks in particular seem to be a hot item for spammers, and also disinfectants and other commercial products related to medical hygiene.

I’m posting the email below because of its astounding chutzpah — not only does this “Israeli scientist” want to sell some sort of anti-coronavirus snake oil, but he is charging $3,000 for two bottles of it!

And buyers are required to pay him in Bitcoin, of all things.

You have to wonder how brisk business is for this enterprising fellow (or chick — there’s no way to tell):

Coronavirus Drug Update: The Latest Info On Pharmaceutical Treatments And Vaccines

Coronavirus Resource Center

The rapid spread of the virus that causes COVID-19 has sparked alarm worldwide. The World Health Organization (WHO) has declared this rapidly spreading coronavirus outbreak a pandemic, and many countries are grappling with a rise in confirmed cases. In the US, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is advising people to be prepared for disruptions to daily life that will be necessary if the coronavirus spreads within communities.

An Israeli scientist works at a laboratory at the MIGAL Research Institute in northern Israel, where efforts are underway to produce a vaccine against the coronavirus adapted from one for infectious bronchitis virus, on March 1, 2020. To boost the immune system, physicians can use drugs like interferons. These are signaling proteins that serve as alarm bells in the body, activating an immune response. Interferons have been used to treat autoimmune diseases and viral hepatitis. “It’s a double-edged sword,” said Shi from the University of Texas Medical Branch. “If you activate them at the wrong time or if you activate it too much, it causes a lot of inflammation, which can cause disease.”

So to treat a virus, doctors have to balance attacking the virus directly without causing any collateral damage to the body, or they have to strengthen the body’s defenses while preventing the virus from causing even more harm. Interferons have already been used to treat Covid-19 cases in China, but it’s unclear how effective they are on their own.

After our research at the MIGAL Institute in northern Israel, we are able to produces drugs for coronavirus.

This drugs is to help you prevent coronavirus ONLY.

Here’s a drugs to some of the most talked-about efforts to treat or prevent coronavirus infection, with details on the science, history, and timeline for each endeavor.

We present two bottles of a natural covidrug which also come with coronavirus emergency kit to you today.

This drugs is to use for preventing coronavirus ONLY.

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Frick and Frack at Sea

To take your mind off the Chinese virus, here’s another inimitable pastiche by JLH.

Frick and Frack at Sea

by JLH (with apologies to Edward Lear)

I

Bernie and Biden were all at sea.
Their faces as green as the kelp.
They brought some money — but it was funny,
They both still needed more help.
Biden looked up at the stars above,
And sang to his mandolin:
“Oh Bernie my friend
You’re insane without end.
What an absolute kook you are.
You are,
What a nutcase from Vermont you are!”

II

Bernie said to old Joe, “It’s too bad that your Id
Is the only thing left of your mind.
If you’d done all the things you said that you did
We wouldn’t be in this bind.”
So they sailed away, for a year and a day,
To the land where the money tree grows.
And there on a hill, a Hillary stood,
With a permanently out-of-joint nose.
A nose.
A permanently out-of-joint nose.

III

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Religion vs Religion

In his latest essay, our Israeli correspondent MC wades into the deepest swamps of the Culture Wars.

Religion vs Religion

by MC

Perhaps my love of America and all things American has its roots in the regular supply of US comics sent to my brother and me by various relatives in the ’50s and ’60s, and amongst which was the occasional edition of MAD magazine.

Much of MAD was over my young head, but Spy vs Spy was always amusing and sticks in my mind, especially their pointed snouts clamped together when investigating a box (trap) from opposite sides.

However, Religion vs (political) Religion is not so amusing, nor is it confined to ink and paper, for the successful side of Western culture is defined by its (Christian) religion, and its demise is defined by the political religions which seek to destroy Christianity and all that goes with it.

The Christian revolution (I am not a Christian but I believe in the Bible) occurred when the Bible was translated into local languages and printed for all to read, and the Church was dragged out of its roots of feudalism (slavery) into what became democracy and even republicanism.

An important part of this process was the separation of Church and State; the Church having been responsible for many abuses that had held the communities of Europe in thrall for over a thousand years.

The feudal system over which the Church held suzerainty was a typical product of tyranny: a small elite, the aristocracy, owning most of the people as serfs, to do with as they please, and a tiny middle class of tradesmen to manufacture those things consumed by their betters. This was just a slight variation on the ‘warlord’ culture that has run most of the world from time immemorial and to this day in some places.

In the UK the feudal system was broken first by the Black Death, which killed off some 30% of the workforce. The subsequent competition for labour destroyed the idea of ‘ownership’ of people. Secondly, and as a consequence of this pandemic, a growing equality of opportunity was provided by increasing access to quality education. Ex-slaves and serfs used their newfound freedom to better themselves.

Under the feudal system, the church provided education and the higher-IQ peasant children were syphoned off into the cloisters. To a great extent this provided the stability required as potential peasant leaders were ‘kidnapped’ into religion (Janissaries, anybody?). Heresy invited a death penalty and life was cheap. In feudal times the Church was very much a political religion, and the Pope reigned over all the monarchs of Europe.

All this emerging freedom from under the tyranny of political religion, however, took hundreds of years to get to the idea of individual liberty. The cultural and economic impacts were minimised by being spread over such a genteel timescale. My paternal grandfather was a boy coalminer at age 12, but his sons went to grammar schools, receiving a quality education, and his youngest son even got a bachelor’s degree in engineering.

But do not think that the ‘elites’ did not fight back. Their main ploy was to create another politicized version of the feudal system that the church had failed to sustain. This took the form of ‘socialism’ where the elite claimed to be working in the best interests of the ‘working class’ by controlling all aspects of their lives. This was yet another political religion, of which we have now seen quite a few forms. Each causes its own mayhem, because there is no separation between political religion and state, and thus there is nothing to stop the killing when it inevitably starts.

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Love in the Time of Coronavirus, Round 4

I had to go to the dentist this afternoon in Charlottesville to get a tooth filled. I half-expected the office to call me this morning and reschedule until after the plague crisis, but they didn’t, so I went ahead and kept the appointment.

The dentist’s office took elaborate precautions against the Wuhan Coronavirus. When I arrived they questioned me about whether I was showing any symptoms, and then took my temperature (which was normal). While that was going on, staff members were swabbing down EVERYTHING in the waiting room.

The receptionist had me wait in my car until I was called. And I had to do a special antiseptic mouthwash before I got my tooth filled.

I told the dentist that he should maintain social distance. We had a nice chat about the possibility of using remote-control waldoes for dentistry. Apparently such things already exist: tiny mechanical “hands” that can work far back in the throat, controlled by some kind of joystick device.

The dentist’s assistant told me that Charlottesville had reported its first confirmed coronavirus infection, and that there was one in Harrisonburg, too.

Apparently I was one of the few patients who hadn’t called in and cancelled. They said they’re closing on Thursday because everybody has cancelled. As for next week, they’re waiting to hear what the CDC says.

Just for the heck of it I went to Walmart afterwards. They were out of a lot of stuff, so it’s a good thing I wasn’t there for food or toilet paper. But I noticed they had bread and milk, which surprised me. And plenty of bananas this time! So I bought a few.

Traffic was noticeably light. I was there at what should have been rush hour, but there really wasn’t any. The road home was almost empty.

When I got home, I saw a report that San Francisco has ordered all residents to stay at home 24/7 until April 7. The only exceptions are to go to a medical appointment or a grocery store. Where there will be no toilet paper, of course.

An Open Letter to Cindy Sheehan

This week’s edition of Dymphna’s Greatest Hits takes us back to a topic that after fifteen years has already faded into the mists of history. Cindy Sheehan had her fifteen minutes of fame, and then she moved on to… Well, to whatever people do when their fifteen minutes is up.

For those of you who are too young to remember, or weren’t paying attention at the time: Cindy Sheehan’s son Casey was killed in the Iraq War in 2004. In the summer of 2005 she made headlines as antiwar activist cum grieving mother who held a vigil outside George W. Bush’s ranch in Texas to protest the Iraq war. Later she took part in other “peace” actions, and was associated with Code Pink in some fashion.

Dymphna’s take on Cindy Sheehan was quite different from what was going around in the rest of the right-wing blogosphere in 2005. Since she had lost her own child just two years before, Dymphna had some insight into what another grieving mother might be feeling, and addressed her in that spirit.

It’s now been nine months since Dymphna died. Last summer was a time of horror and devastation for me, against which my psyche has protected me by making me unable to remember a lot of it. I just have flashes, snapshots, brief vignettes from those first awful weeks — enough to recall the utter misery of it. And it’s still here with me, but nowhere near as intense.

However… After living with Dymphna through the time of Shelagh’s death, I can tell you that the death of a child is far worse than the death of a spouse. Dymphna never really came back to her old self afterwards. I encouraged her to start this blog as a way to bring herself out of the worst of it, to mitigate her bottomless sorrow by doing something useful and important that drew on her gifts as a writer.

And here I am, fifteen years later, circling back to revisit that difficult time. Re-reading her essay brought it all back for me.

An Open Letter to Cindy Sheehan

by Dymphna
Originally published August 20, 2005

I had to look up your name since I have avoided your story as much as possible. Not out of a lack of compassion for your sorrow, but rather because of my own fragility and the sorrow I carry for my own dead daughter.

Here’s what I know about your story — and when you think about it, to have learned this much despite not having a TV and making an effort to avoid learning about your odyssey, it’s amazing I know as much as I do.

Your son Casey was a soldier and he died in Iraq. At first, you were able to maintain in the face of this catastrophic loss. I believe you even met with the President at one point? See — even I, with no access to regular media and a real wish to avoid your story, even I know these things. Or maybe what I “know” is some garbled version of what has been going on for you in your public grief.

This is a guess — an educated guess from one mother of a dead child to another — but I think things began to unravel as time went on and the reality of Casey’s complete and total and lifelong and irrevocable absence hit your consciousness like a fist sinks into a gut. And the bunched knuckles kept coming back to deliver blow after unending blow.

One picture I happened upon in the grocery store showed you on your knees. I presume it was taken in Crawford since someone who didn’t know me well wanted to discuss your story and said you’d gone to President Bush’s ranch. I remember turning away from your face as you knelt there. Yours was a sorrowful visage, a broken face like the reflection from a fractured mirror. My heart twisted for you even though I barely glanced at the picture.

Your grief has served to polarize others. Some say you’re being used, some dismiss you as “crazy” — and tell me, what mother of a dead child isn’t crazy? You’ve been cheated of your son; you walk through the valley of the shadow of death and no one comes to greet you. There will never, ever again be a laughing bear hug from this son grown tall and handsome.

When a husband or wife dies, we call the surviving partner the widow or widower. Why do you think it is that there is no one word to describe our condition, Cindy? Mother-of-a-dead-child is the best we can do? The lack of a name gives you some inkling how much our culture avoids the knowledge of this sorrow. If we named it we’d have some power over it. But the condition you and I share is unnamed because since time immemorial parents have dreaded this loss. It is the worst. There is nothing else that can be done to us. A motherless child is a pitiful creature and carries a life-long emptiness he or she tries to fill with other grown-ups. A childless mother is a crazy person and nothing can fill the hole, not if she had a baby a year for the rest of her life.

Do you have other children? I have three. And when people ask me, pleasantly, “how many children do you have?” I look at them blankly. It is all I can do to not to run screaming from the room.

Here is where I liken my experience to what is happening to you: after Shelagh’s sudden death, after the Rescue Squad carried her off and I watched them disappear down the drive, after the Medical Examiner returned her body to us, there was lots to do. The first morning I awoke I heard her say distinctly, laughing, “Mom, welcome to the first day of the rest of your life without me.” I think she was trying to make it easier in her Shelagh way.

There was so much to do. Her children needed clothing for the funeral, there were burial arrangements to make, a minister to call, family visitation to be arranged, a burial service to be created. So many, many people to notify. Elderly grandparents and a large contingent of Irish relatives to talk to and arrange for flights. As the days passed, I thought to myself “I can do this. I can just keep having this whole thing to organize and plan and I’ll be okay. As long as I never have to bury her, I’ll be fine.” Yes, this is crazy thinking. Even then, I vaguely knew that.

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Love in the Time of Coronavirus, Round 3

Based on media reports, America is in a state of hysteria over the Wuhan Coronavirus. I haven’t experienced any of it personally, however, perhaps because this is the remote hinterland of the Virginia Piedmont, where the hysteria has yet to penetrate. Intuition tells me the amount of hysteria over the disease is directly proportional to the population of a city or town, and I live in a completely rural area, far from even a small town.

I went to a St. Patrick’s Day Party last night. Two of the ladies who hosted it are in their eighties, and it was attended mostly by geezers, with just a couple of younger fellows in the crowd. There was no hugging this time, and less hand-shaking than usual. I shook a couple of hands when offered; I’m not worried about such things. Perhaps I should be, but I’m not.

Any elbow-bumping at the party was done ironically or in jest. But I did see some “Namaste” gestures among the guests.

There was some discussion about the Great Plague, especially the cancellation of church services and Friday’s ukase from Governor Ralph “Coonman” Northam ordering the closure of public schools for two weeks. But there was plenty of normal talk, too — local politics and events, family news, the telling of jokes and old stories, etc. No sign of hysteria. The two women in their eighties — who have COPD — are aware that they’re in a high-risk group. But they don’t seem to be worrying about the coronavirus any more than I am.

After I had collected my plates and containers (I had brought finger food) and was saying my good-byes, I told them that I would let them know if I came down with the coronavirus. They said they would greatly appreciate that…

Love in the Time of Coronavirus, Round 2

I went to a big-box grocery chain today, and thank goodness I didn’t need to stock up on toilet paper, hand sanitizer, frozen vegetables, or fresh meat — there weren’t any of those. And no bananas! Why bananas??

However, there was plenty of cheese, cured meat, and gluten-free bread, which was what I went there for. And the store was fully stocked with French, Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese wine, just like it always is.

Bacon, sausage, ham, eggs, toast, and wine. What else do I need?

Oh, that’s right — Irish whiskey. I had to go to the ABC store for that. No shortages there.

I saw one face mask at the supermarket, and an employee was wiping down the handles on all the shopping carts as they came in. Other than that — and selected empty shelves and overloaded carts in the checkout lines — there was nothing unusual.

There were no screaming fights over toilet paper, but that may be because there was no toilet paper whatsoever in the store.

The “Islam is Peace” Deception: Six Statements


George W. Bush with CAIR in the mosque for the “Islam is peace” message

The “Islam is Peace” Deception: Six Statements

Michael Copeland

Here are six statements which can easily be verified.

Islam authorises the deception of non-Muslims in the cause of Islam.

“Using deception to mask intended goals” is Muslim Brotherhood (MB) strategy.

The MB’s main front group is the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR).

CAIR supplied George W. Bush with the “Islam is peace” message.

It was deception: Islam means “Submission”.

The deception of Bush has been a very successful propaganda coup.

Will any media relate these statements?

For previous essays by Michael Copeland, see the Michael Copeland Archives.

Love in the Time of Coronavirus

The title of this post has nothing to do with its content; it just seemed an appropriate header in these parlous pandemic times for an off-topic quote.

The text below is an excerpt from Baja Oklahoma by the late Dan Jenkins (who is better known as the author of Semi-Tough). Dymphna and I both loved the book. At some point back in the ’80s she photocopied the page, trimmed it, and posted it on the refrigerator. When we got a new refrigerator in about 1990, the yellowed clippings from the old one went into an envelope marked “FROM THE OLD REFRIGERATOR”. I found that envelope a few months ago when I was going through boxes of stuff, and have restored the excerpt to the refrigerator:

Mankind’s Ten Stages of Drunkenness

In only twelve years of marriage, Bonnie fancifully transformed herself from Rita Hayworth into Joseph Stalin.

Bonnie deserved all the credit for driving Slick to a unique psychological discovery, the unearthing of Mankind’s Ten Stages of Drunkenness, which were:

1.   Witty and Charming.
2.   Rich and Powerful.
3.   Benevolent.
4.   Clairvoyant.
5.   F**k Dinner.
6.   Patriotic.
7.   Crank up the Enola Gay
8.   Witty and Charming, Part II.
9.   Invisible.
10.   Bulletproof.
 

The last stage was almost certain to end a marriage.

“It’s Their Interpretation of Islam”

“It’s Their Interpretation of Islam”

by Michael Copeland

“Ah, but it’s their interpretation of Islam”, we are assured by smooth-talking muslim speakers. Journalists have picked this up, and dutifully write about “an extremist interpretation” that lies behind the latest atrocity. This assurance about interpretation is surprisingly successful. It is designed to make us doubt what Islam’s source texts mean, including — and this is the crafty part — those whose meaning is clear and obvious. We can easily be taken in by this appealing and fair-sounding assertion. It puts us off the scent. That is the idea.

First, it is necessary to clarify what is meant by an “interpretation”. If an instruction says “give away one tenth of your income to charity”, that does not require an interpretation. The meaning is quite clear, and the instruction can be exactly followed. An “interpretation” is different. Say a politician repeatedly evades an interviewer’s question with some bland generalisation. Eventually the interviewer says, “I’ll take that as a ‘No’”. That is an interpretation. It is quite a different matter from the straightforward following of what a text says.

Bearing in mind that the Koran — all of it — forms part of Islam’s law, how does the “interpretation” allegation stand up to the test?

Let us see. We can take commands and instructions from the Koran and Hadith and compare them with what muslim leaders and speakers say.

Hatred

Koran 60:4 praises the “excellent pattern” shown by Ibrahim when he said (to the Jews):

“Between us and you enmity and hatred forever….”.

How do the spokesmen treat that?

  • Osama bin Laden: “Enmity and hate shall forever reign between us.”
  • Osama bin Laden: “Battle, animosity, and hatred — from the Muslim to the infidel — is the foundation of our religion.”
  • islamqa.com: “Muslims in the West must have … enmity and hatred of the kaffirs.”
  • Alminbar.com: “You should hate them, disown them and their religion.”
  • Abu Usama, Birmingham: “No one loves the kuffaar. We hate kuffaar.”
  • Anjem Choudary: “As a muslim I must have hatred for everything non-Islam.”
  • Yousuf Makharzah, muslim cleric: “Animosity towards the Jews is an obligatory religious duty, and one of the signs of the believers.”

Killing

The Koran commands:

  • “Kill the non-muslims wherever you find them” 9:5
  • “Kill them wherever you overtake them, and expel them from wherever they have expelled you….” 2:191

What do the clerics say?

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