And the Glory of the Lord Shall Be Revealed

Merry Christmas, everyone!

The photo above was taken here at Schloss Bodissey, but not today. That was Christmas of 2009, possibly our most recent white Christmas. Today it’s very mild, almost like spring.

For your listening enjoyment, here is an excerpt from The Messiah by George Frideric Handel. Sir Colin Davis is conducting the London Symphony Orchestra, and Mark Padmore is the soloist, if I’m not mistaken.

The libretto is based on Isaiah 40:

4   Every valley shall be exalted, and every mountain and hill shall be made low: and the crooked shall be made straight, and the rough places plain:
5   And the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together: for the mouth of the Lord hath spoken it.
 

The future Baron is here. He is the designated cook, now that his mother is gone, and will be preparing a nice London broil for our Christmas dinner.

Posting for the rest of the day will be light, possibly just the news feed.

I’m thankful that I live here in the Outer Boondocks, far from the full Coronamadness that people in most large cities have to endure this Yuletide.

For example, the governor of New York has just signed a new law that will make the forgery of a “vaccination” card punishable by up to a year in prison. Which I suppose will eventually lead to scenarios like this one:

But let’s not think about that right now — we’ll just enjoy the celebration of the birth of our Savior Jesus Christ.

And it’s OK if your Christmas is white.

10 thoughts on “And the Glory of the Lord Shall Be Revealed

  1. Merry Christmas Baron.

    Thank you for providing the site.

    Thank you for having the sight to provide the site.

    Merry Christmas to everyone who frequents the site

  2. But let’s not think about that right now — we’ll just enjoy the celebration of the birth of our Savior Jesus Christ.
    Amen, Baron.

  3. And a happy (belated) Christmas to all here.

    As a Londoner (since I was 21, back in 1979) I have to ask: what’s a “London broil”? Given that Britain’s not exactly famous for its cuisine (which has been hugely enriched by successive waves of immigrants, from the Jews and Italians onwards, whatever the other issues), I wonder whether it’s truly “native”?

    Slight diversion: I have a blue trenchcoat, which my brother brought from Canada c1980, and gave me as he’d outgrown it; it’s looking a little worn now, but is still admired. The label declares the brand to be “London Towne”, with a picture of Big Ben; even if it didn’t say it was an American brand, you’d know from the spelling. A souvenir from a different age?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.