Putting the Wind up the Germans

The following report discusses the perverse and massive inefficiency of “sustainable” wind power systems in Germany as they are presently constituted.

Many thanks to Hellequin GB for translating this article from eXXpress. The translator’s comments are in square brackets:

Such is the inefficiency of Germany’s wind

Since the energy transition, Germany has relied entirely on renewable energies and has been promoting wind farms throughout the country. However, the operators do not reveal how high the utilization of their systems actually is. A media outlet calculated this and came to a depressing conclusion.

28,000 larger wind turbines are in operation in Germany. No one knows how many of these are profitable. Germany’s operators of wind farms guard their utilization “like a state secret”, writes the NZZ [Neue Zürcher Zeitung]. The Schweizer Tageszeitung therefore examined and calculated the utilization of 18,000 of these systems using a simulation. To do this, they “evaluated hourly weather data over a period of ten years”.

The result is sobering, sometimes even shocking.

All systems can survive only through subsidies

A system is not economical without a certain capacity utilization. According to the head of the Stuttgart Chair for Wind Energy, Po Wen Cheng, a capacity utilization of around 30% is required for this. According to research by the NZZ, just 15% of the systems have a capacity utilization of more than 30%. If one also considered that wind turbines are often switched off because of noise and environmental protection regulations, the proportion would be even lower.

In almost a quarter of the wind turbines examined, the capacity is less than 20%. “Such systems are only viable thanks to the German subsidy system, which also rewards bad locations.” The nationwide average utilization of the wind turbines is just 24%.

Where there is industry, there is no wind

The situation becomes even more worrying when one considers how the wind turbines are distributed geographically. Most electricity is needed where German industry is located. The problem: The wind does not orient itself to the locations of the industry. It blows mainly in the north, which is why the majority — 83% — of the well-utilized wind turbines are located there.

[Map link]

However, industry is located mainly in the Ruhr area and in the southernmost federal states — Bavaria and Baden-Württemberg. The power gap is also the greatest in these regions. But the south in particular is extremely windless, which is why the poorly utilized wind turbines are primarily located there. While in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany’s northernmost federal state, the utilization of the wind turbines is an average of 31%, in Baden-Württemberg, where there is little wind, it is only 17%.

Therefore, huge power lines are now being built to transport the electricity to where it is actually needed, reports the NZZ.

There are hardly any investors

Little good can be expected for the future, so Germany’s energy policy promises little hope. By the end of 2023, all Federal States must reserve two PERCENT of their area for wind power — despite these enormous differences. The NZZ doubts that they will find investors for it. Especially in the south, where electricity is needed most urgently, hardly anyone wants to invest. That is not surprising.

Afterword from the translator:

Let me get that straight; 15% of the systems have 30% and 25% have 20% utilization. That’s what I call efficiency. So if you install 1 GW, the result of the 40% of the systems is: 0.15 * 0.3 + 0.25 * 0.2 = 0.045 + 0.05 = 0.095 or approximately 10%.

If the remaining systems deliver the same, then they deliver about 20%. You then get 0.2 GW from 1 GW of installed capacity. And that is supposed to be sustainable? Is that why they are still so hell-bent on the jab in Germany?

And then these bird- and bee- and bat-shredders (wind turbines) also change the local climate because they disturb the western wind flow and therefore more warm and dry winds from the south and Sahara come to Europe. That’s why it’s often warmer in Europe in the summer than in the Canary Islands where a old school friend of mine lives. During the summer he tells family and friends, “If you want to cool off, fly to the Canary Islands.”

The figures given are very optimistic, according to a report from ZDF, the “exploitation of bird- and bat-shredders” should be 10% on the lake and 8% inland. Don’t ask me where they got those figures from; could be from Greta Thunfish or other such exalted Climate EXPERTS.

And then there’s the infrasound of the “bird- and bat-shredder”, which apparently causes cancer. Adolf already knew that when he tried such infrasound weapons out for the “Endsieg”. Infrasound, which we don’t hear, causes tissues to vibrate, and particles that every animal has in its body, damages the DNA of the animal (man is just an animal, too).

Climate experts (not the inexperienced pro-government baby babblers) warned years ago about the negative impact of wind turbines on the climate. Recently, looking at the weather maps, I noticed that Germany is almost always divided in two: A diagonal from the North Sea to Saxony or Thuringia divides the country into rainy and dry areas. No wonder that in the East even the grass does not grow normally and the leaves of the trees hang down as if withered. This is, at least in my humble opinion and how I understand this, due to the wind turbines in the north, which slow down the humid air. And the predicted air flow from the Sahara has now also occurred. But the [stupid people] are happy about the oh-so-beautiful red sunrises or sunsets.

2 thoughts on “Putting the Wind up the Germans

  1. I disagree with the the Afterword from the translator: No big deal, just that the wind turbines are too low to do anything with the winds from Sahara.

    What I believe is really happening is that the turbines in the North Sea mix morning dew air with the air above the morning dew and the grass is dry on the mornings… It basically destroys the Earths Boundary Layer where morning fogs happen, and mosquito flies.

    Anyhow, I happen to have worked on a few of these. They are very impressive machines up close. But ever since I was doing some work on one in Danmark, I was thinking: “How do they expect to ever make money on these?” The ammount of Zinc-Steel, and all the Fiberglass and copper and everything…. There is a lot of real material in each one of these.

    The Danish Windfarms were planned for 24 years of operation, but broke after 12 due to micro-salts in the North Sea air. Or so I heard. So – another “trick” on their menu is – say that the planned lifespan of the Windmill is 100 years and your accounting gets AAA++ rating. Simple!

  2. Just like the Germans to construct what are likely exquisitely engineered and meticulously fabricated wind turbines that seldom operate due to fickle winds when what the country and German industry really needs is inexpensive Russian gas and cheap, clean electricity from homegrown nuclear power. Always focused on how something can be done rather than on the why or even if a thing should be done; that, and reasons, because an ignorant pigtailed Swedish minger said so.

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