Judgment in Augsburg

A young culture-enricher is currently on trial in the German city of Augsburg for a sixfold case of attempted murder. Like so many “new Germans” who interact with the justice system of the Bundesrepublik, the defendant has a surname consisting only of a single letter — news reports identify him as “Haidar A.”

Mr. A. is on trial for attempting to kill five judges and a prosecutor during a previous trial, in which he had been accused of — wait for it — attempted murder. His first attempt at homicide (since coming to Germany, that is) occurred at an asylum center in Hurlach, where he tried to halal-slaughter his roommate.

This time Mr. A. is making his court appearance behind bulletproof glass while thoroughly shackled, with a spit-helmet over his head to prevent him from spitting on all the infidels around him.

Many thanks to MissPiggy for translating this article from the Augsburger Allgemeine:

Trial in Augsburg: Islamist Wanted to Shoot Judges

Trial Begins with Turmoil

by Jörg Heinzle

A 26-year-old Syrian allegedly tried to shoot the judges and the public prosecutor with the service weapon of a policeman at a trial in Augsburg. The trial begins with a wrangling with security forces.

In Augsburg, a suspected Islamist is on trial for six attempted murders. Did he want to shoot five judges and a prosecutor?

After just a few seconds there is a first scandal in the large courtroom of the Augsburg Criminal Justice Centre. The defendant spits in the direction of the journalists who photograph him. Shortly afterwards, when the judges enter the hall, Haidar A., 26, refuses to stand up. There is a wrangling with judicial officers and policemen. When the situation calms down again, the presiding judge, Sandra Mayer, orders that the accused must wear a spit-protection hood made of thin fabric over his head during the trial. It is supposed to prevent him from spitting.

The trial in the Regional Court in Augsburg that started on Tuesday was already being held under tightened security measures. Haidar A., who claims to be a Palestinian, allegedly tried to murder several judges and a prosecutor during a previous trial. The prosecution accuses the man, who also attracted attention through his Islamic statements, of six attempted murders.

The incident occurred in the summer of 2017, when the Syrian was on trial in Augsburg for trying to behead a roommate in an asylum in Hurlach (Landsberg district). He had rammed a knife into the roommate’s throat. The stab wound was twelve centimeters deep; the victim survived only thanks to a quick emergency operation. During the sentencing phase for the crime — for which he was sentenced to nearly 13 years in prison for attempted murder — Haidar A. tried to grab the pistol of a policeman. There was a wrangling, but in the end several officers managed to overpower him and restrain him. Haidar A. had previously also thrown a shoe at the prosecutor and spat several times in the direction of the judges.

The defendant admits that he tried to grab the gun

Haidar A. admits without hesitation that he wanted to grab the policeman’s weapon and shoot the prosecutor and the judges with it. He just did not succeed. “I would have started with the prosecutor,” he said in court on Tuesday. He felt he had been treated unfairly by the judiciary. He defends himself for the knife attack on his roommate in the asylum. The roommate had repeatedly insulted Islam. This was the only reason why he attacked him and stabbed him with a knife.

He does not accept it when someone insults his religion, says Haidar A. “Then I get angry”. The presiding judge wants to know whether he will also become violent in the future if someone insults his religion. He only answers: “Not immediately.” When he is asked whether he is an Islamist, he says: “I am proud to be a Muslim.” He also says that although he does not hate German society, he hates the German police and judiciary.

The defendant stated in an interrogation by the police that he had fled Syria because of the civil war. During his flight, he was also temporarily accommodated and well treated by the terrorist organization Islamic State, so he could not say anything bad about the ISIS. As a Palestinian, he also sympathized with the Hamas organization, which is classified as a terrorist group. He admits that he has experience in dealing with weapons, but wasn’t familiar with the official’s service pistol, a P7 from Heckler & Koch. Haidar A. says that he did not expect to be able to take the gun and fire it anyway.

However, the pistol was loaded with eight rounds of ammunition. The 55-year-old policeman appeared as a witness in court and said he noticed that the defendant had grabbed his belt. However, he did not succeed in pulling the weapon out of the secured holster. In order for such an incident not to happen again in the current trial, the 26-year-old has to sit in the dock this time with his hands and feet tied. In addition, a glass pane separates the defendant from the bench.

He spoke calmly about his hatred of the German state

A detective who spoke to Haidar A. in prison for a long time says the situation during the interrogation was very unusual. The defendant openly talked about his hatred of the German state — and showed no remorse. At the same time, however, he was friendly and courteous during the interview.

Haidar A.’s lawyer Walter Rubach says he has doubts that the crime was an attempted murder. A. admitted to having reached in the direction of the service weapon. However, the first testimonies at the trial suggested that he had not implemented his plan with the vigor required for an attempted murder. The trial will continue in about two weeks.

The following op-ed from Politically Incorrect (also translated by MissPiggy) concerns the trial in Augsburg:

Augsburg: Syrian Wanted to Murder Judge and Prosecutor

by Johannes Daniels

“I don’t care if I’m to blame for the influx of refugees, now they’re just there,” explained the mother of migration with visibly moving pride.

And NOW the Islamic menaces from all over the world just happen to be “here”.

In Augsburg, a Syrian-Palestinian ISIS terrorist is on trial for six attempted murders. During a trial in July 2017, he wanted to murder five judges and a public prosecutor.

There was a state of emergency this past Tuesday in the large conference room of the Augsburg Criminal Justice Centre. The defendant Haidar A., 26, screamed loudly and spat while he squirmed in the grip of police officers. Since Haidar A., who “fled from violence” in his home town, tried to shoot the entire court including the jurors and public prosecutor two years ago, the Syrian is currently being tried in the Swabian metropolis behind bulletproof glass and under the highest security measures. The asylum seeker was already was standing trial before the Augsburg Regional Court two years ago and is sufficiently familiar with German jurisprudence.

The gift of Islamic terror

On 7 November 2016, the Syrian brutally rammed a knife into the neck of his roommate Omar A. in the refugee home in Hurlach (Landsberg district) and tried to slaughter him in a “halal” manner. The stab wound was 12 cm deep [4.72 inches]. The victim survived only thanks to a quick emergency operation in the Landsberg hospital. On 25 July 2017, Judge Susanne Riedel-Mitterwieser, 62, sentenced the “person seeking protection” to twelve years and nine months’ imprisonment for attempted murder — but he completely lost his mind once he heard the sentence. At first he spat towards the bench and shouted: “To hell with you and those who created you.” Then he took off his black prison shoe and threw it towards the public prosecutor Michael Nißl, 40. Then police superintendent Richard G., 55, threw himself at the Chancellor’s guest of honour to strap him down. That’s when Haidar A. reached into the bailiff’s holster. According to the indictment, Haidar tried to seize, release and shoot the eight-shot loaded service weapon Heckler & Koch P7. According to Public Prosecutor Andreas Breitschaft, “He wanted to take the security personnel by surprise so that the targeted victims would be defenceless at the mercy of his deadly retaliatory action.” As a result, no fewer than four officials wrestled down the adherent of the religion of peace and prevented a further grab at the service weapon.

Haidar under the hood — The ISIS-Look in German courts

But there wasn’t any sign of remorse or guilt in the Islamic gift of terror on Tuesday. As a precautionary measure, the presiding judge, Sandra Mayer, had already ordered the presence of six officers in the courtroom, along with hand and foot cuffs and safety glass.

When Haidar A. entered the courtroom on Tuesday, he spat hatred out in the direction of the photographers. He also refused to stand up in front of the judge “for religious reasons”. Thereupon it came to “a wild scuffle”. When the situation calmed down again, the presiding judge ordered the defendant to wear a spit-protection hood made of thin breathable fabric over his head during the trial. It is intended to prevent him from spitting around himself. Haidar A. now has to wear this attractive-looking headgear during the trial until the judgment on 25 September.

The rabid Syrian, who say he’s now a Palestinian, confirmed all the accusations in the indictment and even went beyond them:

“It is true: If I had been given the gun, I would have shot the court and started with the prosecutor. No, I’m not sorry for my behavior. What the court and the prosecutor did to me was terror. I regret that the man I stabbed in the throat is still alive. He insulted my religion. I would not have been punished for it in Syria.”

According to the testimony of the bailiff, whose weapon Haidar A. wanted to seize, we learn how narrowly the Syrian’s targeted attempt at murder failed: “He had his right hand on my belt. The cap of the pepper spray was already open, but the weapon did not come out of the holster.”

Moreover, the defendant confirmed that “he had knowledge of weapons handling from the civil war” — and had been accommodated by the terrorist organisation ISIS during his escape. “They were always friendly to me,” Haidar A. explained during the police interrogation. As a Palestinian, he also sympathised with the Hamas organisation, which was classified as a terrorist group — similar to the way ex-Communist Frank-Walter Steinmeier and Foreign Mini Heiko Maas indirectly support a terrorist organisation: “Germany is increasing financial aid for UN-Palestinian Relief Agency.”

Haidar A. spoke openly about his hatred of the German state

For the knife attack on his roommate in the Landsberg asylum, he defended himself through his taxpayer-financed lawyer Walter Rubach from the asylum industry. After all, the roommate had repeatedly insulted Islam. This was the only reason he attacked him and stabbed him with a knife. He doesn’t accept someone insulting his religion, says Haidar A. “Then I get angry.” The presiding judge wants to know whether he will also become violent in the future if someone insults his religion. He only answers: “Not immediately.”

When asked if he was an “Islamist”, Haidar said: “I am proud to be a Muslim.” Through his taxpayer-financed interpreter, he also stressed that he did not hate German society, but the German police and judiciary. “He spoke calmly about his hatred of the German state,” reports the Augsburger Allgemeine. That’s a relief.

An Augsburg detective, who spoke to Haidar A. in prison for a long time, explained that “the situation during the interrogation was very unusual”. The accused had openly spoken about his hatred of the German state — and had shown no remorse. At the same time, however, he was friendly and courteous during the conversation. There doesn’t appear to be any gratitude toward Germany, the host country, for protecting him.

Haidar’s lawyer Walter Rubach emphasized in an adapted taqiyya manner that he had doubts that the crime was an attempted murder. A. admitted to having reached in the direction of the service weapon. However, the first testimonies given in the trial gave the impression that he hadn’t implemented his plan with the vigour required for an attempted murder. The trial will continue in about two weeks — by then maybe he’ll run out of spit.

13 thoughts on “Judgment in Augsburg

  1. Deport Him ASASP, He is animal who hates all Europeans / Christians , go back and start rebuilding your country you savage ..

    • If I was dictator, I wouldn’t even bother to deport that filth; he isn’t even worth the cost of a bullet. Replacing the fabric bag over the head with a plastic one is about all he is worth. If he wants to be of some use in spreading islam he can do it as fertilizer.

  2. At this point I’m really curious. Are Muslims this homicidal in their home countries, or is this behavior primarily for the “benefit” of the kaffir? You’d think that by now this mayhem would have attracted the attention of western sociologists. I mean, this is A LOT of killing.

  3. There’s nothing to say. The German authorities in power are like the Democrat candidates for the nomination: they’re beyond logic and consequences. And so is their constituency, which consists of government dependents and brain-washed victims of university indoctrination.

  4. He’s not very good at murder. Maybe the Merkel government can retrain him in a more suitable career, like ‘child molester’ of ‘Village idiot.”

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